A picture paints a thousand words | SierraSun.com

A picture paints a thousand words

Barbara Perlman-WhymanGood Reads

What is the use of a book, thought Alice, without pictures or conversations? Lewis Carroll, Alices Adventure in Wonderland (1865)Remember the old adage, Dont judge a book by its cover? But how often we do remember a book by its artwork: a book cover, a frontispiece and an illustration. Remembering childhood books always integrates the images on the page with the words written for us or spoken to us. The pictures of Alice with the drink me glass by Sir John Tenniel, Pinocchios nose growing by Enrico Mazzanti, elaborately detailed, beautiful works of Walter Crane in fairy tales such as Beauty and the Beast and nursery rhymes adorned by charming pictures by Kate Greenaway are all classics and are symbiotic with celebration of the book. Published more recently, but yet decades ago, we all can still visualize the cat in the hat by Theodor Geisel (otherwise known as Dr. Seuss), the wild things of Maurice Sendak, Babar and his friends by Jean de Brunhoff, and the million of cats of Wanda Gag.Illustrious history Modern book illustration began in the 15th century with block books in which the text and the illustration were cut on the same block. Book illustration followed closely the development of the printing process. In the following two centuries, copperplate engraving and etching replaced the original woodcut, but the transformation really took hold in the 18th century with the use of wood engraving, developed by Thomas Bewick and the invention of lithography by Senefelder. These two processes had a tremendous impact on the production of illustrated books and magazines and brought masters of art such as Daumier, Dore, and Gavarni.

By the 1860s, color printing was widely used and the development of color wood engravings by publisher Edmund Evans had a lasting impact on the quality of illustrated childrens books. Early books used only three colors, but later a greater range of color was employed. In the beginning, pages containing illustrations were only printed on one side of the paper, but the use of heavier papers removed this limitation. Text, ornamentations, pictures, cover and end papers were all considered important to the total design of a volume.In the late 19th century photomechanical processes were developed which made possible the reproduction of a wide variety of painting and drawing techniques. At times this led to cheap and rapid but sloppy mass production, obscuring the artistic potential. But it also allowed major illustrators, such as Aubrey Beardsley, Howard Pyle, and Elihu Vedder to use it with great effect in reproduction of their artwork. Later the development of the half-tone process and then the Colortype process meant even more subtle color effects were possible. Both Arthur Rackham and Beatrix Potter combined the use of watercolor with pen and ink with outstanding success. The four-color process required the use of heavy gloss paper so illustrations were tipped in to the letterpress text pages.Judge for yourselfBy the 1920s, offset printing was introduced, offering several advantages over the other methods of reproduction. It allowed for reproduction of very fine lines, the plates were durable, a wide variety of paper stock could be used and original artwork did not have to be reversed prior to reproduction. The process allowed for variations in the placement of text and illustration, resulting in an increased integration between image and text.During the 20th century, the illustrated childrens book emerged as an important component of the publishing industry and many of the illustrators became household names. Improvements in print technology have made it possible for all illustrators to work in a variety of different ways and the range of styles is immense. Traditional approaches such as pen and ink, watercolor, and colored pencils still are popular, as are the techniques of collage and assemblage and the use of computer-generated imagery. So, perhaps today we should judge a book by its cover.

1) On Thursday, Feb. 8 from 5 to 7:30 p.m. an opening reception for Another 10 percent with Leah Ruby and Fred Nochella will be held in the Tahoe Gallery, located on the third floor of the Sierra Nevada College Prim Library. The public is invited. 2) Rodney and Evelyne Smallwood Campus Store located in the Prim Library at Sierra Nevada College is open to the public and carries art supplies.Open during school sessions:Monday through Thursday 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.Fridays 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.Most Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.Located in Prim Library, first floor behind the circulation desk. Competitive prices to what you might find in Reno or Carson City. Willing to do special orders if dont have exactly what a person needs.Carries good selection of art supplies needed for classes taught in drawing, painting, printmaking and photography and ceramics (except clay).Basic colors in acrylic paintsSome oil paints on sale for half priceBrushesLarge and small canvases 54 x 54 to 12 x 12B&W film in 35 mm and 120Paper for photo printing, including muralDrawing paper and sketchbooksPencils, charcoal, pastel chalksPrintmaking ink and cuttersGet SuppliesLakeside Gallery in Kings Beach, (530) 546-3135, also carries art supplies for painting and drawing but not for printmaking, photography and ceramics.What are book groups reading in February?Incline Village Library Village Book Talk: The Long Walk: The True Story of a Trek to Freedom by Slavomir Rawicz. This group meets Wed. February 21 from 10 to 11:30 am, is free and is open to the public.Incliners Book Group: Colorado Mountain Women by Sherry Fox SchmauderTahoe Book Group: Not Me by Michael Lauvign

Beyond primary colorsBy the 1860s, color printing was widely used and the development of color wood engravings by publisher Edmund Evans had a lasting impact on the quality of illustrated childrens books. Early books used only three colors, but later a greater range of color was employed. In the beginning, pages containing illustrations were only printed on one side of the paper, but the use of heavier papers removed this limitation. Text, ornamentations, pictures, cover and end papers were all considered important to the total design of a volume.In the late 19th century photomechanical processes were developed which made possible the reproduction of a wide variety of painting and drawing techniques. At times this led to cheap and rapid but sloppy mass production, obscuring the artistic potential. But it also allowed major illustrators, such as Aubrey Beardsley, Howard Pyle, and Elihu Vedder to use it with great effect in reproduction of their artwork. Later the development of the half-tone process and then the Colortype process meant even more subtle color effects were possible. Both Arthur Rackham and Beatrix Potter combined the use of watercolor with pen and ink with outstanding success. The four-color process required the use of heavy gloss paper so illustrations were tipped in to the letterpress text pages.Judge for yourselfBy the 1920s, offset printing was introduced, offering several advantages over the other methods of reproduction. It allowed for reproduction of very fine lines, the plates were durable, a wide variety of paper stock could be used and original artwork did not have to be reversed prior to reproduction. The process allowed for variations in the placement of text and illustration, resulting in an increased integration between image and text.During the 20th century, the illustrated childrens book emerged as an important component of the publishing industry and many of the illustrators became household names. Improvements in print technology have made it possible for all illustrators to work in a variety of different ways and the range of styles is immense. Traditional approaches such as pen and ink, watercolor, and colored pencils still are popular, as are the techniques of collage and assemblage and the use of computer-generated imagery. So, perhaps today we should judge a book by its cover.