Comment period opens on Canyon Springs | SierraSun.com

Comment period opens on Canyon Springs

Greyson Howard
Sierra Sun

Canyon Spring’s impact documents have been released, and traffic continues to be a primary concern for many.

Work stations at a Tuesday meeting on the Glenshire-area subdivision detailed sections of the draft Environmental Impact Report, including geology, biology, water quality, population, cultural resources, air quality, noise, aesthetics, public services, land use and hazards.

But it was the exhibit on traffic issues that received the most attention from the public. With the release of the draft document, interested members of the public will have until June 11 to comment on the issues, adding their concerns or insights to the report.

The environmental report looked at the impacts of traffic generated by the new development on local streets, intersections and public safety.

“My concerns are, while I think some growth is good, this is going to put a lot of stress on the roads,” said Glenshire resident Ron Salomon. “I don’t want to stop them, I just want them to build responsibly.”

According to the report, the only significant impact would be on the intersection of Glenshire Drive and Donner Pass Road, which would reach failure if not improved before the completion of Canyon Spring’s 213 housing units.

Project manager Gavin Ball said previously that the Glenshire-Donner intersection is expected to be improved as part of the Railyard project downtown, and Canyon Springs would be built in phases, to keep numbers low before the improvement is made.

Some roads in Glenshire will see large increases in traffic, notably the two access points to the project on Edinburgh Drive and Martis Peak Road, but the report states that the increased traffic will remain within acceptable levels.

Figures for average daily trips on those roads show an increase from 150 to 1,630 on Edinburgh Drive, currently a cul de sac, and an increase from 280 to 1,560 on Martis Peak Road, according to the report.

Glenshire Drive could see an increase from 8,160 daily trips to 9,680 as well.

General Manager Geoff Stephens of the Glenshire Devonshire Residents Association said the association would like to see changes to the project to reduce traffic.

“Our position has always been that we want density reduced so traffic is reduced,” Stephens said. “While they went from 250 units to 213, we don’t think 213 really reduces density. We would like to see a better project.”

Salomon thought the traffic impacts in the community would be more significant than reported.

“I was told by the traffic people that the traffic study was performed in the summer, not the winter. Put a foot or two of snow on the road and not that many people will be able to make it through,” Salomon said.

Ball said that in addition to the EIR’s findings on traffic, the development team hired a consultant to look at ways the project could help with traffic issues throughout Glenshire.

“The question is what does this project create or exacerbate, and the answer is none except for the Glenshire Drive/Donner Pass Road intersection,” Ball said. “And that may be true from a numbers standpoint, but we wanted to see if the project could bring improvements to existing problems like Dorchester and Glenshire or Martis Peak and Glenshire. This goes above and beyond the EIR.”

For more information on the rest of the Environmental Impact Report or to submit comments, contact Denyelle Nishimori, associate planner for the Town of Truckee, at 582-2934, or by e-mail at dnishimori@townoftruckee.com.