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Sustainability club works to restore Truckee River tributary

Just outside of downtown Truckee on the small but important tributary, Trout Creek, Sierra Watershed Educational Partnerships’ Envirolution club members from North Tahoe and Truckee High Schools met to volunteer for a stewardship day.

Trout Creek originates north-east of Donner Lake and flows through the town of Truckee until it eventually joins the Truckee River. As one of the 63 streams that flows into the Truckee River, water quality needs to be monitored. Trout Creek has been degraded due to increased developmental pressures over the past 150 years and therefore needs restoration to promote healthy creek beds, biodiversity and pollution reduction.

The day began with a presentation about the restoration of Trout Creek by Todd Landry from the Town of Truckee. Students gathered to hear about the historical land-use impacts, current watershed conditions, need for restoration and the importance and benefits of this restoration project.



Eben Swain from the Truckee River Watershed Council offered information on water quality monitoring and in-depth instruction on how to utilize the TRWC’s specific water quality monitoring tools. Students then were dispatched into groups and spread out along the creek to acquire data using the tools provided by Truckee River Watershed Council.

Once water quality data was received, students used the iNaturalist app to document the variety of plant life in the restoration area and then proceeded to do a litter pick up in the area. Students collected 117 pounds of trash in one hour.



Students received reusable water bottles from Tahoe Water Suppliers and ice cream from Little Truckee Ice Creamery for their efforts on this volunteer day.

This stewardship day was in preparation for a larger restoration project to be implemented by the Town of Truckee. This project will help to restore Trout Creek to create a healthy fish habitat, increase riparian vegetation and provide flood protection for downtown Truckee.

Source: SWEP

Eben Swain from the Truckee River Watershed Council (TRWC) offered information on water quality monitoring and in-depth instruction on how to utilize the TRWC's specific water quality monitoring tools.
Provided photo
Once water quality data was received, students used the iNaturalist app to document the variety of plant life in the restoration area and then proceeded to do a litter pick up in the area.
Provided photo
Students collected 117 pounds of trash in one hour.
Provided photo
Students received reusable water bottles from Tahoe Water Suppliers and ice cream from Little Truckee Ice Creamery for their efforts on this volunteer day.
Provided photo

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