Evolving Red Tuesdays help electronic music grow in popularity at Lake Tahoe | SierraSun.com

Evolving Red Tuesdays help electronic music grow in popularity at Lake Tahoe

Pati Sainz de Rozas
During the April 10 show, Benjah Ninjah and Philharmonic opened with their unique beats.
ALL |

Electronic music has been around for decades but, in recent years, the genre has been growing in popularity at a fast pace all over the world.

Lake Tahoe is no exception. With a variety of local deejays and music producers, the bars and venues of the area have opened up their doors to accommodate and support local talent and well-known artists.

One of the more popular spots to see live electronic music every week is at Crystal Bay Casino. The casino’s Red Room, now a staple in the North Shore electronica scene, plays host to Red Tuesdays, a night dedicated to live music, showcasing local talent and giving up-and-comers as far as the East Coast to Colorado a chance to spread their whomping sounds.

According to Brent Harding, talent buyer for the Crown Room and Red Room at the CBC, Red Tuesdays was initiated five years ago.

and#8220;Red Tuesdays started because we wanted to have something for the DJ crowd,and#8221; said Harding.

Tahoe musician Zeb Early, an all-around North Tahoe rock star, is the man responsible for booking all the shows.

and#8220;It’s been good to bring music from L.A. and the Bay to Tahoe and spread it around,and#8221; said Early.

On Tuesday, April 10, Benjah Ninjah and Philharmonic from South Lake Tahoe opened up the night with their unique sound, which mashes old school hip-hop such as Dr. Dre and Butang with electronic and dubstep sounds from artists such as Beats Antique and Paper Diamond.

and#8220;The goal is to create that track to be sounding different than what it originally will sound like,and#8221; said Ben Gilbert, aka Benjah Ninjah. and#8220;When you look at old school hip-hop, or you use 80s (music), or whatever it is, those are the things that makes people happy because they are remembering little parts of their past.

and#8220;You want to relate to what they have heard, or somewhat seen before and that makes people really happy, bring those happy little songs, like when you are a kid.and#8221;

Los Angeles musician Jobot, hailing from Headtron Crew, was the final performer for the evening. Being trained in traditional music as a stand-up bassist, Jobot brings fresh melodies and dirty crunchy bass, all while singing on top of his own tracks.

and#8220;I try to bring people that appeal to a wider audience,and#8221; Early said. and#8220;I really like musicians that are also deejays like Jobot. He sings and#8212; he is a professional musician and a bass player.and#8221;

On Tuesday, April 17, two ladies captivated the crowd with a well-rounded performance at the Red Room and#8212; Lil Miss Mixer, from Reno, and Smasheltooth, from Santa Cruz. An all-female lineup is rare, considering the electronic music genre is mostly male-dominanted.

Lil Miss Mixer appeals to the heavy dubstep crowd. Her music incorporates deep bass, hard drops and lasers, all on top of female vocals. Smasheltooth got concert goers in the mood to move their feet with hip-hop beats and melodic mash-ups, sampling new- and old-school music.

and#8220;Dubstep is the rock music of electronic music,and#8221; said Samantha Rawlings, alias Lil Miss Mixer. and#8220;Dubstep is the electronic fix of the metal, rock genre music.

and#8220;You’ve got your pop music and you got your hard rock music, is the same thing with electronic music. You got your poppy house music and then you got your rock music which is dubstep.and#8221;

According to Harding, Red Tuesdays will take a month break after April and start back in July. The last show was this Tuesday, April 24, hosting Early and Russ Liquid.