Graduation 2012: On the record with Truckee High’s top academic performers | SierraSun.com
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Graduation 2012: On the record with Truckee High’s top academic performers

Jenell Schwab
Sierra Sun
Photo by Jenell SchwabThese three top-performing students from Truckee High School are among the 2012 senior class who who will graduate Saturday. From left, Valedictorian Makaiah Mohler, Salutatorian Fenja Hass and Valedictorian Kiersten Knoppel.
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TRUCKEE, Calif. and#8212; It’s an exciting time of life. This week, graduating seniors at Truckee High School will start down a new path of their own choosing.

Commencement is set for 11 a.m. at Surprise Stadium at Truckee High School.

The school’s three top academic performers were asked to answer a few questions; read what some of our future leaders had to say below.

What will you do after high school? After high school, I will be attending Colorado College, a four-year liberal arts institution in Colorado Springs. I will play volleyball on the varsity team as well. I am very interested in math and the sciences. At this point I am not sure what my major will be, but I would definitely like to explore neuroscience.

What was the last thing you learned? What is the most important thing? The last thing I learned in high school was how to name organic carboxyl groups in my AP Chemistry class with Mrs. Lowder. The most important thing I learned throughout my school career is that everyone has value and something that he or she can contribute. I learned this not through just one class, but through many teachers and experiences.

When you think about yourself at the age 40, what do you envision? I consider myself a life-long learner and can only imagine my sense of fascination continuing. My soul home is in the classroom, and I enjoy learning about a variety of issues. I can envision myself as a professor at a liberal arts school similar to the one I will be attending. I would also like to have a family.

What are you most curious about? Robert Frost said, and#8220;We dance round in a ring and suppose, but the secret sits in the middle and knows.and#8221; I believe that psychology, science, mathematics, humanities, communications, English, and history all allow you to try on lenses through which you participate in the dance of intellectual curiosity. I am interested in the and#8220;secretand#8221; or mysteries, in general.

What is your first rule of high school survival? What tip would you give incoming freshman? Truckee is a small town, so end all of your relationships with grace because that person will be your best friend’s boyfriend or down the road, your kid’s AYSO soccer coach.

What will you do after high school? After high school I will be attending Georgetown University in Washington, DC. While there I shall major in Government, and hopefully concentrate on environmental public policy.

What was the last thing you learned? What is the most important thing? To pinpoint the last thing I learned would be quite impossible. Throughout high school I have discovered I am eternally learning, not only in the classroom, but in all aspects of life, and perhaps this idea is the most important thing I have learned.

When you think about yourself at the age 40, what do you envision? At age 40, I hope to be returning from a United Nations Summit after successfully enacting global environmental policies, arriving at Capital Hill to continue my work in domestic politics and be continuously living a healthy and happy life with my family and friends.

What are you most curious about? I am most curious about how mankind will face the issues to come. Although I cannot predict what shall occur in the future, perhaps it is this uncertainty that makes the concept of the future so alluring.

What is your first rule of high school survival? What tip would you give incoming freshman? Looking back on my high school experience, I would strongly advise not falling down the school’s main stairwell, in front of all of your classmates, on the first day of freshmen year. I know it didn’t workout that great for me, but who knows, perhaps you’ll rock the falling down look! Besides this painfully obvious advice, my number one rule for surviving high school is to not take things personally. Everyone is trying their best to make it through this tedious four year journey, and its best to brush off any unintentionally hurtful comments and simply enjoy your high school experience while you can!

What will you do after high school? After high school, I will be attending University of California San Diego and will be studying International Relations.

What was the last thing you learned? What is the most important thing? Recently, I’ve been learning about our government and the Spanish language. The most important thing I’ve learned is transparency; what it means to be open and upfront in my relationships.

When you think about yourself at the age 40, what do you envision? At age forty, I hope to be trilingual, married, have a family and possibly have traveled and#8212; or am in the middle of traveling and#8212; the world.

What are you most curious about? There seems to be an endless amount of things I’m interested in: cars, history, surfing, rock climbing, fencing, archery, farming, biology, theology, psychology, business, figure skating, music, singing, languages, art, cooking and dancing.

What is your first rule of high school survival? What tip would you give incoming freshman? Through high school, I have focused on my life and what I want out of it. It sounds incredibly self-centered, but it’s allowed me to avoid the typical high school drama, like cliques and peer pressure. I’ve been able to do the things I enjoy, prepare myself, think about my future, and find out who I am. But what’s really gotten me through high school and#8212; and what everybody including freshman should have and#8212; are several extremely close trustworthy friends who you can completely confide in and be confided in, as well as be goofy, crazy, angry or sad with.


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