Hundreds march in solidarity, peaceful protest at North Tahoe-Truckee | SierraSun.com

Hundreds march in solidarity, peaceful protest at North Tahoe-Truckee

KINGS BEACH, Calif. — Saturday marked not only the first full day of Donald Trump's journey as U.S, president, it also marked the day that hundreds of thousands of people marched around the world in solidarity to protest core cultural issues.

Locally, hundreds of those people — many of whom were women — were proudly and peacefully marching in North Lake Tahoe and Truckee.

"It was one of the best days I've ever had here," said professional community organizer and longtime local Theresa May Duggan, who helped put together the Kings Beach Women's March. "This is the first time a lot of us have smiled since November 8. It's the first time a lot of us could laugh — it hasn't been easy."

Duggan worked with a committee of dedicated locals, organizing the powerful event as one of more than 650 marches held in unison, spanning America and many countries around the world.

"What I saw that day in every face was pure pleasure of being with like-minded people," Duggan said. "What is better than that? It was so deep, I had to keep sunglasses on because I was tearing up every single minute."

In Kings Beach, people from all walks of life attended, marching two-by-two in a crowd of over 700 from the North Tahoe Event Center to Highway 28, to the boat ramp and back.

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Much of the crowd repeated the loop after having completed it.

"We had angry grandmas with their daughters, with their daughters and their fathers." Duggan recalled. "It was amazing to see the range of generations, and I was just like, oh my God, future feminists, everywhere!"

Each of those who participated had personal motivation for attending.

Sue Rossi was one of the brave marchers who shared her story as she hoisted a hot pink sign that read "ACA Saved My Life … 3x Cancer Survivor," regarding the Affordable Care Act, often referred to as Obamacare.

"I was paying over 2 thousand dollars a month for health care," said Rossi. "It went down with Obamacare, which, right now, I would be dead from the stress alone — we used our home equity and everything."

Diane Angel, a 14-year resident of Tahoe City, said: "I am so grateful for Obamacare. My brother was diagnosed with stage-4 lung cancer. He was not going to live. He had a preexisting condition; he was 64, was not eligible for Medicare and had no benefits. Had it not been for Obamacare, my brother would be dead. Instead he's alive, plays golf every day and loves his children and wife, his grandchildren and me. I am so grateful for Obamacare."

Incline Village resident Jacquie Chandler, another local activist, said, "I am grateful to be here and thank you TART for giving us a lift from Incline; we took four cars off the road today because we're not trading blood for oil anymore, thank you."

For those involved in the historic event and dedicated to bringing change in the future, Duggan said this past Saturday's march is just the beginning.

"We're going to organize, we're going to mobilize, we're going to visualize our goals, and we're going to realize victory," she said.

Those who couldn't join the hundreds of women, men and children in Kings Beach due to hazardous storm conditions on Highway 267 hosted an impromptu march in downtown Truckee.

Roughly 200 people reportedly attended that march, and others even parked their cars alongside Highway 267 and other spots Saturday and proudly displayed their signs wherever Mother Nature stopped them.