North Tahoe PUD upping offseason parking fee | SierraSun.com

North Tahoe PUD upping offseason parking fee

Margaret Moran
mmoran@sierrasun.com
Rick Fuller, a part-time park and recreational employee for the North Tahoe Public Utility District, collects parking fees Sunday at the Kings Beach State Recreation Area.
Margaret Moran / mmoran@sierrasun.com | Sierra Sun

2014 PARKING FEES

• $5 for non-district residents during offseason (Oct. 1-May 31) at both locations.

• Free for district residents with a vehicle sticker during offseason.

• $10 for non-district residents during peak season.

• $6 for residents with a vehicle sticker during peak season.

— District residents are eligible for sticker(s), since they pay an annual property assessment that supports upkeep, operation and maintenance of NTPUD facilities.

— A sticker can be obtained by visiting the NTPUD office at 875 National Ave. in Tahoe Vista, or by filling out and mailing an online application, found through northtahoeparks.com/resident-benefits.php. Proof of residency is required.

KINGS BEACH, Calif. — Drivers pulling into the Kings Beach State Recreation Area and North Tahoe Regional Park this year will still pay parking fees — but at a new cost.

Instead of charging non-North Tahoe Public Utility District residents $3 to park at those venues during the offseason, they will pay $5. District residents with a vehicle sticker still can enter for free.

“The $3 fee was set in the ‘80s, and our maintenance costs have gone up significantly since then,” said Tracey Towner, NTPUD park and facilities manager. “The $5 fee doesn’t even begin to cover it, but it’s a modest enough increase that people seem to be OK (with it).”

Monte Webb, owner of Jason’s Beachside Grille in Kings Beach, located next to the recreation area, said he understands the reason for the increase.

“The lower the better, but they need to maintain the park,” he said.

The new rate took effect Jan. 14, after PUD board approval.

On select days, a parking attendant at the entrances of both areas will enforce fees, continuing an effort that began in November 2013 after the honor system proved ineffective.

“They were supposed to be paying all along,” Towner said. “They just weren’t, and now they are.”

The PUD collected nearly $2,500 in November, nearly $4,000 in December and $3,159 as of Jan. 20 in fees, generating a profit after attendants were paid.

“Anytime you generate a little more revenue to offset some of the maintenance costs, it’s very useful because it gives everybody something hopeful,” Towner said.

Recently, the roof of a restroom at the regional park was replaced using the fees, she said.

More maintenance work is needed at both venues. Since the Kings Beach park is a state-owned site, funds raised there will be invested there.

“The fact is it’s still the PUD’s job to look out for these amenities,” Towner said.