Tahoe chief’s corner: Compulsive hoarding and associated fire risks | SierraSun.com

Tahoe chief’s corner: Compulsive hoarding and associated fire risks

Mike Brown
Special to the Bonanza

Mike Brown

Many fire departments are experiencing serious fires, injuries and deaths as the result of compulsive hoarding behavior.

The excessive accumulation of materials in homes poses a significant threat to firefighters fighting fires and responding to other emergencies in these homes and to residents and neighbors.

Often, the local fire department will be contacted to help deal with this serious issue. Since studies suggest that between three and five percent of the population is compulsive hoarders, fire departments must become familiar with this issue and how to effectively handle it.

WHAT IS HOARDING?

Hoarding is defined as collecting or keeping large amounts of various items in the home due to strong urges to save them or distress experienced when discarding them. Many rooms in the home are so filled with possessions that residents can no longer use the rooms as designed. The home is so overloaded with things that everyday living is compromised.

WHY DO PEOPLE BECOME HOARDERS?

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Hoarding is a mental disorder that can be genetic in nature, triggered by traumatic events, or a symptom of another disorder, such as depression, obsessive compulsive disorder, or dementia. Studies have found that hoarding usually begins in early adolescence and gets worse as a person ages. It is more common among older adults.

WHY IS HOARDING AN ISSUE?

Hoarding can be a fire hazard. Many occupants die in fires in these homes. Often, blocked exits prevent escape from the home. In addition, many people who are hoarding are injured when they trip over things or when materials fall on them.

Responding firefighters can be put at risk due to obstructed exits, falling objects, and excessive fire loading that can lead to collapse. Hoarding makes fighting fires and searching for occupants far more difficult.

Those living adjacent to an occupied structure can be quickly affected when a fire occurs, due to excessive smoke and fire conditions.

Learn more about these and other safety issues with the National Fire Protection Association at nfdpa.org.

"Chief's Corner" is a regular feature in the North Lake Tahoe Bonanza from North Lake Tahoe Fire Protection District Chief Mike Brown, offering information, tips and education material on fire safety, emergency preparedness and other pertinent topics.