New owners moving forward with Canyon Springs development | SierraSun.com

New owners moving forward with Canyon Springs development

Greyson Howard
Sierra Sun
Sierra Sun file photoThe northern portion of the Canyon Springs property and Eastern Glenshire, looking toward the Truckee River and Interstate 80.
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TRUCKEE, Calif. and#8212; The 283-acre property east of Glenshire known as Canyon Springs has drawn controversy under past owners and previous development proposals.

But the new owners, collectively called Canyon Springs Joint Venture, say they aim to avoid conflict through open discourse and a new plan that calls for fewer lots and more open space.

and#8220;Weand#8217;ve been meeting with a number of organizations and neighbors that have expressed interest in the project in the past, and we will continue these outreach efforts during the review process,and#8221; said Christopher Huck, one of the property owners.

The tentative plan calls for the phased buildout of 185 clustered lots, down from the previous ownerand#8217;s plans for 213 homes, Huck said, leaving about 65 percent of the property as open space.

Eight lots would be affordable housing triplexes, he said.

and#8220;I believe this is the right time to pursue approvals to prepare for future improvements in the marketplace,and#8221; Huck said of the current economy. and#8220;It will be market driven and#8212; we anticipate it will be phased over a six-to-10-year period.and#8221;

As the project moves forward, Huck said the owners would use preferential bidding for local contractors on streets and utilities.

Leigh Golden, president of SOS Glenshire, a grassroots conservation group born out of the debate over the previous Canyon Spring proposal, is one of the people who has walked the property with the new owners.

and#8220;I think the density is too high for the community and#8212; it may not be right for the community. We already have a lot of vacant homes,and#8221; Golden said.

Huck said a new website detailing the project is set to launch within a week, with plans to submit tentative map applications to the Town of Truckee soon thereafter.

Emphasis will be put on green building and planning techniques, the remaining open space, a network of trails potentially connecting to existing Glenshire paths and potentially even an organic garden, Huck said.

He said property owners will keep an eye on the recently-launched deer migration survey for a herd that ranges from the Martis Valley to Verdi, and said theyand#8217;ve taken on a few deer studies of their own.

By maintaining a large percentage of open space, requiring leash laws, prohibiting off-road motor vehicles and making other improvements, Huck said he expects to keep the area suitable for deer migration, along with other wildlife.

Golden said SOS Glenshire will follow the environmental review process for the project, looking for experts and seeking to recommend changes or mitigation where it sees appropriate.

One of the major concerns Glenshire residents had about previous proposals at Canyon Springs was traffic generated by the additional homes routed through residential neighborhoods.

Like the previous plan, Huck said the new project would connect at two points: Martis Peak Road and Edinburgh Drive, now a small culdesac.

But to keep the bulk of the traffic out of Edinburgh and the surrounding residential neighborhoods, Huck said the group will recommend an emergency-access-only gate at that entrance, requiring day-to-day traffic to use Martis Peak.

and#8220;I think the gate is a good start but it could put a lot of vehicles at the east end of Glenshire Drive, so the question is, do they go on Interstate 80 or drive down Glenshire Drive all the way?and#8221; said Dan Warren, general manager of the Glenshire Devonshire Residents Association.