Cannibal Cruise cruises into Truckee | SierraSun.com

Cannibal Cruise cruises into Truckee

Alisha Wyman

Rick Gunn/Sun news serviceArt Winston shines his 1931 Ford Victoria, which he plans to show in this year's Cannibal Cruise.

After the hundreds of hours Art Winston put into customizing his 1931 Ford Victoria, he is still not afraid to drive it.”I drive it everywhere,” he said. “It has the appended rock chips to attest to the fact that it is what we call a ‘driver,’ not a ‘trailer queen.'” The two terms refer to whether a classic car is driven or trailered to car shows.Winston, who lives Carson City, has built his car to drive and handle like a modern car so he would be confident it would run smoothly on the way to the many car shows he attends, including Truckee’s Cannibal Cruise, which is on this weekend.Part of the appeal of the hobby for Winston is his ability to tailor his car to his tastes.”Each classic car is unique in itself,” he said. “They don’t come off the production line. Each component is a reflection of the owner.”Winston’s Ford Victoria has an all-steel body-something that he said is rare. He refurbished it himself, contracting what he couldn’t do to those who specialize in it.A Ford Victoria was a model he’d always wanted. He bought it in Sacramento six years ago, and it has been a work in progress ever since.”I think a lot of people don’t realize what it takes to get one of these,” he said. “You don’t just rush down to the dealer on the corner and buy one.”After acquiring a street rod, the work is far from over, Winston said. Classic car lovers are religious about the upkeep of their cars.”Probably half of today’s cars on the highway would not pass the safety inspections that we subject our cars to,” he said. “We take very good care of our cars. We make sure everything works all of the time”Winston began the hobby with a1939 Plymouth two-door sedan he converted into his first hot rod. He worked on it himself-making mistakes and correcting them.”I think that’s how you learn,” he said. “I’ve been (working on hot rods) a long time, and I never get tired of it.”Winston is part of the South Lake Tahoe Road Knights, a club of classic car enthusiasts. They hold various fund-raisers to support their habit and often caravan to car shows together.It’s also a way to promote their interest to younger generations, Winston said. He is pleased when teenagers are genuinely interested in classic cars.”We’d like to perpetuate the hobby,” he said.A few years ago the club accepted a member who was 18 years old. He had inherited an Oldsmobile 442 from his grandmother, Winston said. He wanted to learn about hot rods, but had no one to teach him.”It felt good that he came to us,” Winston said. “That kind of ‘feel good’ is probably what it’s about-sharing the hobby with people who are interested.”Cannibal Cruise Car Show and FairJuly 11-13, 2003Truckee Regional ParkNo charge to spectatorsFriday, July 11Noon – 7 p.m.Car regisrtationFriday night concerts – tickets recquiredTickets available pre-sale at Bank of the West, USA Media,Truckee Donner Chamber of Commerce and Plumas Bank for $15 and at the gate for $206 p.m.Gates open6:30-7:30 p.m.Road Rockets8 p.m. Starship with Mickey ThomasSaturday, July 12All dayCraft Fair, Nostalgia Fair, food, games7-10 a.m.Breakfast at senior complex8-10 a.m.Car registration11 a.m.-3 p.m.Show n’ ShineNoon-3 p.m.Judging4-8 p.m.B.B.Q. (Steak or Chicken, tickets recquired)6-7 p.m.Car cruise8 p.m.-midnightSock-Hop featuring Papa Clutch & The Shifters (tickets recquired)Sunday, July 13All dayCraft Fair, Nostalgia Fair, Food, Games8 p.m.-noonPoker Run (open to everyone)1-3 p.m.Parade of Winners