Volunteer Corner | SierraSun.com

Volunteer Corner

Amy Edgett/Sierra SunSarah Trebilcock

It’s very big and broad. Where do I start? I was working with the Forest Service on a bunch of restoration and rehabilitation [projects] after fires and floods, and funding was drying up. There needed to be a way to figure out how we could continue the work with volunteers. We decided to get things done we needed to raise awareness, and Truckee River Day began 12 years ago. Ours was going to be a restoration and educational river day, not just a cleanup. This spawned into the Truckee River Habitat Restoration Group, an all-volunteer, nonprofit status.

At the same time, another group was coordinating resource management, and as that group grew, we decided paid staff was needed. The two groups merged into the Truckee River Watershed Council, hired paid staff, got more and more grants and dug into bigger projects.

A lot of them are after flood projects where we revegetate. Several years ago there was a massive landslide on Pole Creek, which is an important habitat for the Lahontan trout, a protected species. The landslide across 89 went into the Truckee River, and we had a huge project at the Shell station near Donner Creek. This was a big revegetation project.

We also pulled the old bridge out of the Truckee on West River Street. Where roads are decommissioned there are terrible erosion problems. Up on the Little Truckee River, where the campgrounds are, we ripped out railroad grades. After the Martis burn, we’ve had the biggest project replanting up in Coldstream Canyon.

It’s going to be Sunday, Oct. 14, and it’s best to register before Oct. 5. There are half- and full-day projects for everyone ages 4 to 80. You may call the Truckee Watershed Council at 550-8760, visit http://www.truckeeriverday.org, or e-mail info@truckeeriverwc.org. There are different levels of intensity. Groups can stay together ” like fifth-graders on Trout Creek.

I was the founder 12 years ago with Alice Berg, who was with the U.S. Forest Service at the time.

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I like it because we’ve been able to make all sorts of agencies join together through he Watershed Council. It’s good to bring ski areas, homeowners, county agencies, the U.S. Fish and Game together to get funding for projects. It’s hugely impressive.

Pole Creek. It was incredible. We had 10 to 12 landscape contractors, the energy of the group and the end results were fantastic. When you see the results, it makes everyone happy.

Through Truckee River Day and educational materials we try to help people understand the ecology of our area. Through different groups we are emphasizing how important it is to protect the McGlashan Springs area.

Yes. I have a bachelor’s in botany, and have done graduate work at U.C. Davis. In 1975 I began the Villager Nursery in Truckee, and teach skiing at Alpine Meadows. I still do both.

I am particularly interested in the riparian plants and carnivorous plants. We have two different species of Drosera rotundifolia up at Sagehen. They are a carnivorous plant that dissolves insects or anything that lands on them.

There is also a rare orchid I like up in Treasure Mountain, north of Truckee. It is a spotted coral orchid, which is green. Nobody has seen a green , I don’t believe.

Hiking with my dogs, and I am a quilter. I quilt by myself or with my 90-year-old mother, who I visit several times a year.

We’re always looking for volunteers. Many different areas like graphics, stuffing envelopes, weed eradication, group leaders. Visit the Web site and find what fits. Seeing the results is satisfying.