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Redistricting may switch Congressmen

Erich Sommer, Sierra Sun

Even if U.S. Rep. Wally Herger, R-Marysville, is reelected next fall, he may no longer be representing the citizens of Truckee and Nevada County.

The change is a result of the congressional redistricting plan proposed last week in Sacramento.

If approved by the Legislature and signed by Gov. Gray Davis, the plan will move Truckee and Nevada County from Herger’s 2nd Congressional District into the 4th Congressional District, presently represented by John Doolittle, R-Rocklin.

Nevada County would fall in the middle of the rearranged 4th District, which will include Alpine, El Dorado and Placer counties on the southern end and stretch all the way to Modoc County and the Oregon border. Doolittle would no longer represent Amador, Calaveras and Tuolumne counties.

Truckee is currently part of the vast 2nd Congressional District, which includes 10 counties and runs north all the way to the Oregon border and as far west as Trinity County.

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Under the proposed redistricting plan, Herger’s district will lose all the Northeastern California counties that border the Nevada state line, including Modoc, Lassen, Plumas, Sierra and Nevada counties, while adding the Central Valley counties of Yolo, Colusa, Glenn and Tehama.

“(The proposed boundaries) do change the geographical nature of the district,” said Herger’s press secretary Dan MacLean.

MacLean said the emphasis on regional issues would also change, with less of an emphasis on timber interests and a greater focus on agricultural issues.

“But Congressman Herger is not unfamiliar with agricultural issues,” MacLean said.

“But it’s hard to comment on the (changes), because nothing is approved it’s all speculative,” MacLean added.

Redistricting is done every 10 years based on U.S. census results, to maintain equal distribution of the population among districts.

Currently, each district represents approximately 640,000 residents.

Because of population gains, California will gain one congressional seat. That district is expected to be in located in the Los Angeles area.

The legislature hopes to have a plan approved this week, said Cam Kuwata, spokesman for the Committee on Elections, Reapportionment, and Constitutional Amendments.

The new congressional district lines must be in place for the 2002 elections.


 

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