Tahoe governing agency hires part-time chief operating officer | SierraSun.com

Tahoe governing agency hires part-time chief operating officer

Matthew Renda
Sierra Sun
Sun File PhotoEd Gurowitz.
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LAKE TAHOE and#8212; The Tahoe Regional Planning Agency has hired a part-time chief operating officer to help implement its recently unveiled strategic shift.

Ed Gurowitz, an Incline Village resident and management consultant, began his role with the bistate government agency on July 1, said Jeff Cowen, TRPA spokesman.

TRPA also hired a new public information officer, Kristi Boosman, replacing Dennis Oliver, who died last November.

and#8220;We are pleased to be able to fill these positions with people as highly qualified as Ed and Kristi,and#8221; said TRPA Executive Director Joanne Marchetta. and#8220;TRPA is making fundamental changes in the way we lead the restoration of Lake Tahoe, and we welcome them to our committed team of people working to advance our goals.and#8221;

Achievement of environmental gain on the ground, streamlining the administrative process especially for residential permitting, enhancing operational efficiency and engaging the community compose the four pillars of the strategic shift outlined by Marchetta last year.

and#8220;Ed will focus on installing measurable internal goals and#8212; this is not about external goals, but making us more efficient within the agency,and#8221; Cowen said. and#8220;It’s also about providing accountability to all of our employees.and#8221;

Gurowitz, who owns a doctorate in psychology and is a former liberal columnist for the North Lake Tahoe Bonanza, said he is eager to begin.

and#8220;I am looking forward to working with people in the agency and to continue to turn around the image of the TRPA in the community and#8212; to have it be more customer focused and say yes rather than no,and#8221; he said.

Despite the contentious nature of public discourse in the Lake Tahoe Basin, Gurowitz said the primary goal of the agency’s new strategic plan and#8212; forging public/private partnerships that help facilitate environmental gain throughout the basin and#8212; can be achieved.

and#8220;Whenever you have people with common values, goals … partnership is always possible,and#8221; he said. and#8220;It comes down to focusing on those values and goals rather than the methods employed to obtain them or who’s right.and#8221;

Boosman is a policy researcher and public communications consultant from central Washington, Cowen said. Her previous work included creating local and national public awareness and community outreach campaigns for Public Broadcasting Service station in Seattle.

She holds a master’s degree in public administration.

and#8220;It’s great to be (in Tahoe),and#8221; Boosman said. and#8220;There is no better place to land.and#8221;

Boosman said she has experience in analyzing the interlaced interaction of a given place’s environmental, social and economic well-being.

and#8220;You can’t look at one of these factors in isolation,and#8221; she said. and#8220;It works as an entire system. For instance, if Lake Tahoe was in a severe economic depression, there would be pressure to exploit the lake for financial gain. When you achieve a balance (among) all three of these components it leads to healthy communities.and#8221;

Boosman said TRPA is headed in the right direction, particularly regarding its effort to forge partnerships between public and private entities along with various other stakeholder groups around the lake.

and#8220;I understand there are and is a management consultant groups in the basin,and#8221; she said. and#8220;But our primary focus in bringing them together and we just have to do our due diligence.and#8221;