TRPA responds to group’s request for public information | SierraSun.com

TRPA responds to group’s request for public information

Amanda Fehd
Sun News Service

Tahoe’s planning agency has responded to an information request from the Tahoe Lakefront Owner’s Association with a letter stating “TRPA cannot withhold what does not exist.”

The group had sent a request under state public-record acts for all documents related to the current rules being drafted to govern Lake Tahoe’s shorezone area.

“We just want to see what is being analyzed,” said Jan Brisco, a professional advocate for the group.

“We are trying to keep the pressure on. We should be able to see the entire alternative, a full description.”

John Singlaub, executive director of the Tahoe Regional Planning Agency, gave a Power Point presentation in May on the latest ideas for regulating piers, buoys and motorboats on the lake.

The proposal includes a program that would charge boat owners a sticker fee for recreating on the lake, a $100,000 mitigation fee for a new pier, and a program to address the aquatic weed milfoil.

Recommended Stories For You

The actual wording of the rules are expected to be disclosed this month, after about a six month delay.

Brisco said they would like more detail on how the rules would address public access to the lakeshore when it involves private land in California, and how remodeling a pier would fit into the plan.

In the letter addressed to the lakefront owners’ attorney Daniel O’Hanlon, TRPA’s lead lawyer Joanne Marchetta outlined documents that would apply to the request and said all are already public information: Singlaub’s Power Point presentation, the minutes from the May shorezone workshop, the environmental review documents, public comments on those documents, and Governing Board and advisory planning commission meeting minutes.

“Drafts of what will be final documents are still being prepared and changed as a result of public comments and (Governing Board) comments.

The working, internal, administrative drafts of the EIS and Ordinances are further protected from disclosure by the attorney-client privilege,” Marchetta wrote.