TRPA sticks to denial of Kings Beach project | SierraSun.com

TRPA sticks to denial of Kings Beach project

David Bunker
Sierra Sun

A road project that could have paved the way for residential development at the end of Park Lane in Kings Beach will be on hold for at least a year.

The Tahoe Regional Planning Agency Board decided not to reconsider a previous denial of the project at their Wednesday meeting.

The Park Lane improvements will now have to wait the mandatory year before being resubmitted, or submitted with changes.

The owner of 44 parcels at the end of the street was asking for approval of a fire turnaround and pavement extension on May 24, but was denied.

Kings Beach residents vocally opposed the project, saying the narrow road could not hold additional traffic. The paving would have allowed one additional home to be built on the street, and open up access to the parcels at the end of the street,

“That road, Park Lane, does not meet fire safety requirements by any stretch,” said Richard Reeder, a Kings Beach homeowner. “To add on to that just adds further peril.”

The North Tahoe Fire Protection District, in commenting on the proposal, said the lane did not conform to fire standards. The lane is crooked and a large tree along the road is an obstacle for fire trucks, the district said, according to TRPA documents.

Kings Beach homeowner Sara Weinstock also opposed the project, saying it would change the neighborhood.

“I don’t think this is a project that the neighborhood can sustain,” said Weinstock.

Mike Weber, the South Lake Tahoe city council member who asked the board reconsider the denial, said erasing the TRPA’s denial would help property owner Ettore Bertagnolli in negotiations for the sale of some of the properties to the California Tahoe Conservancy.

But nearby property owners, who spoke with the conservancy, said the denial would have no effect on the conservancy’s decision whether to buy the land.

“Ostensibly it was so that he could negotiate on a more level playing field with the Tahoe Conservancy,” said Reeder. “But that was found to be bogus.”

The conservancy was not available for comment by press time.