Truckee completes purchase of storage yard | SierraSun.com

Truckee completes purchase of storage yard

Greyson Howard
Sierra Sun

Photo illustration courtesy of Town of TruckeeAn aerial view shows the 75-acre property where the Town of Truckee, Truckee Fire and the Forest Service plan new facilities. Interstate 80 is at the top, Glenshire Drive at the bottom, Donner Pass Road to the left and the Highway 267 Bypass on the right.

Plans are falling into place for use of the 75-acre site of a former dump in Truckee bordered by Interstate 80, Donner Pass Road, Highway 267 and Glenshire Drive.

The Town of Truckee closed escrow on the roughly $4 million purchase of a 19.46-acre parcel from the U.S. Forest Service in late July. The town plans call for a new corporation yard to store plows and other heavy equipment, along with a new animal shelter to be shared by the Humane Society of Truckee-Tahoe.

The town intends to sell a 3-acre section of its newly acquired property to the Truckee Fire Protection District, which is considering constructing the district’s ninth station on the site, said Fire Chief Bryce Keller.

The U.S. Forest Service is also developing plans for the remaining 55 acres, said Joanne Roubique, Truckee district ranger.

Public Works Director Dan Wilkins said the town’s next step for the new storage yard will be the hiring of an architectural and engineering team to design the new facility and animal shelter.

Town staff will recommend the San Francisco-based Kappe+Du to town council on Aug. 30 to carry out the design, Wilkins said.

Recommended Stories For You

“We don’t expect to be pursuing any construction until 2009,” Wilkins said.

Also in 2009, the town could begin building a roundabout to provide access to both the new facility and to the Barsell property across Donner Pass Road, the planned site of a new hotel and other development, Wilkins said.

Funding for the new animal shelter is still being worked out, with potential cost-sharing by the Humane Society and possibly Placer County, which may also use the shelter, Wilkins said.

“We’re still on track to acquire the three acres from the town at plus or minus $900,000,” Keller said. “We hope to close escrow by November first.”

The three acres would be home to the district’s ninth station, though district officials don’t expect to begin construction for another seven years, Keller said.

“We are planning for future growth; everyday our call volume increases,” Keller said.

As part of a 20-year plan for the district, the proposed station and a 10th located somewhere on Highway 89 north, will help Truckee Fire keep up with the town, and region’s, growth, Keller said.

Due to the site’s history as a town dump, the Forest Service is cleaning up lead-contaminated soil, Roubique said.

Contractors are moving the contaminated soil to an old gravel quarry on the same property, and capping it to keep the contaminated dust from being released into the air, she said.

“We’ve had the material tested, and it’s not mobile. When it gets wet it doesn’t move, so it won’t contaminate the groundwater,” Roubique said.

The Forest Service’s initial construction will include a new building to replace the Truckee Ranger Station on the north side of I-80, and a fire station of its own, Roubique said.

“The fire station has begun construction and could be complete by next year,” Roubique said. “I would love construction on the office, which is being designed with the intent of being a (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) building, to begin by this fall, but that might be too optimistic.”

Other potential additions to the Forest Service project could include housing for seasonal fire and field crews, as well as a visitor center, Roubique said.