Truckee development: Town groups talk possible benefits of Coldstream project | SierraSun.com

Truckee development: Town groups talk possible benefits of Coldstream project

Greyson Howard
Sierra Sun

TRUCKEE, Calif. and#8212; With a backdrop of scrutiny of environmental issues, debate over reconnecting Deerfield Drive and analysis of economic competition, the town council and planning commission on Monday talked about public benefits that could come out of the Coldstream development project.

Known also as Planned Community One, Coldstream sits on 178 acres next to Donner Memorial State Park, at the mouth of Coldstream Canyon. Project owners Teichert Aggregates has a plan in submittal, and both environmental and economic review documents are in progress.

and#8220;Town council directed staff to look for equal requirements between planned communities for public benefits,and#8221; said Associate Planner Jenna Endres, setting the stage for Monday’s discussion. and#8220;We look to larger developments to go above and beyond.and#8221;

She compared the Coldstream plan to Planned Community Two, known as Gray’s Crossing, which had a number of public benefits from bike trails to land dedications.

Mike Isle of Teichert warned against using Gray’s Crossing, a larger project, as a yardstick for Coldstream, and said many of the elements of the project will have public benefit and#8212; from planned trails to the improved one-time mining ponds, and a planned 109 acres of open space.

Both Jake Hudson of Truckee Trails and Andy Otto of Our Truckee River Legacy Foundation said they were pleased with trail plans and work so far between their organizations and Teichert.

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Likewise, Lisa Wallace of the Truckee River Watershed Council and Pam Armas of California State Parks said they had done a lot of work with Teichert in planning stream restoration for Cold Creek that could reduce erosion and lessen the threat of flooding.

Kaitlin Backlund, executive director of the Mountain Area Preservation Foundation, expressed concerns about the density of the project, and suggested some additional public benefits that might come from the project would be more conservation work in Coldstream Canyon.

Town council member Joan Jones said she is in favor of looking for more benefits from the project that would be for the good of the whole town and#8212; not just project neighbors and#8212; because the impacts of a large project like Coldstream would likewise be felt by all of Truckee.

and#8220;To me, the No. 1 thing is to prove that it’s flood safe,and#8221; said Commissioner Bob Johnston. and#8220;No. 2 is to ensure public access to the pond … then there is the Deerfield Drive connection; I’m still on the fence on that.and#8221;

Council member Richard Anderson said additional improvements to the ecosystem up-stream in Coldstream Canyon would be on his list of benefits, possibly with some kind of water quality monitoring in place. He said in the project negotiations he’d even like to see funding for a new town library be discussed as a public benefit.

Commissioner Steve Ramos said additional affordable housing could also be a benefit of the Coldstream development.

With different ideas suggested, Mayor Carolyn Wallace Dee asked town staff to analyze those possible benefits to see how feasible they are, and to report back in the next meeting.