Truckee Railyard lawsuit: Superior court judge rules in favor of town, developer | SierraSun.com

Truckee Railyard lawsuit: Superior court judge rules in favor of town, developer

Greyson Howard
Sierra Sun

UPDATED: 4 p.m. Friday, May 28

TRUCKEE, Calif. and#8212; A Nevada County Superior Court judge has ruled in favor of the town of Truckee and Holliday Development regarding the planned residential and commercial development at the Truckee Railyard.

In a Wednesday order, Judge C. Anders Holmer denied a petition from the Friends of Truckee, a group who sued last year to stop the Railyard development, a project approved by town council a year ago that is planned for the eastern end of downtown Truckee.

and#8220;Iand#8217;m ecstatic,and#8221; said project owner Rick Holliday in a Friday interview. and#8220;I do feel we had won in the court of public opinion five to zero in the planning commission, five to zero in the town council, and felt the publicand#8217;s voice was loud on this.and#8221;

Town Manager Tony Lashbrook agreed.

and#8220;Itand#8217;s nice to have this hurtle behind us. A lot of time and effort was spent in the community process addressing these issues, and I guess the court confirmed we handled it appropriately,and#8221; Lashbrook said.

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He said the town has been working on the Railyard site since 1995.

Next up, Lashbrook said the town and project owners Holliday Development will likely meet to discuss options moving forward.

Donald Mooney, representing the Friends of Truckee, said Friday he will discuss the possibility of appealing the decision with his clients, an option open for 60 days after the ruling.

Holmer heard arguments on April 2 from Mooney, as well as Whit Manley, Jim Porter and Dennis Crabb, who represented Holliday Development and the town.

The Friends of Truckee challenged the projectand#8217;s environmental review document as it pertained to the restoration of Trout Creek, the study of project alternatives, traffic issues, hazardous materials and other issues.

With state and federal grants the Railyard has applied for, Lashbrook said having the case behind them and#8220;certainly doesnand#8217;t hurt.and#8221;

The project has been awarded about $1.5 million in cleanup funds, and it didnand#8217;t get Proposition 1C infrastructure funds. Possible California Department of Housing and Community Development funds for sustainable communities is still pending, Lashbrook said.

The Railyard development sits on 75 acres east of downtown, with plans that would include residential and commercial zoning, a hotel and a movie theater.

Check back to http://www.sierrasun.com for more to this story as it develops.