Truckees state senator pledges support on several fronts | SierraSun.com

Truckees state senator pledges support on several fronts

David BunkerSierra Sun

Truckees request for more than $1 million in state funding for the restoration of Trout Creek has support in the state capital.California Sen. David Cox (R Fair Oaks) pledged his support for the project during his visit to Truckee last week to speak with town and county officials.Cox, who was elected to the first senate district in November 2004, talked about transportation issues, the new Sierra Nevada Conservancy, watershed restoration and efforts to control West Nile virus in the county during his first trip to Truckee as a state senator. He had visited the town as a senate hopeful in 2004.Truckee is hoping to use state funding to redirect Trout Creek into a natural stream bed that closely follows the creeks historic course.Throughout Truckees history the stream has been diverted through concrete flumes and culverts to make way for downtown development and railroad routes. The town hopes to restore Trout Creek at the same time as it is planning the railyard development property east of downtown. Town planners say the stream has the potential to occupy a central role in the pedestrian-oriented development of the former railroad property. Cox said he will send a letter to the California Department of Water Resources in support of Truckees request.Coxs support is significant since there will undoubtedly be several projects vying for the same Proposition 40 funds, said Truckee Manager Steve Wright. And Coxs support goes beyond the Trout Creek project, Wright said.Ive been doing this business for 36 years now and this was the first time I have has a state senator call me out of the blue, said Wright. It is very gratifying to have Senator Cox in our corner.Cox, who toured the town with Nevada County Supervisor Ted Owens, discussed the West Nile virus threat in rural counties with Nevada County Environmental Health Director Larry Sage.The discussion, said Owens, may lead to Nevada County being able to tap into a statewide fund that could assist rural counties in combating the virus. Coxs office said that after meeting with county officials, they are looking to see what they can do.Its going to be an earlier season for mosquitoes and West Nile, said Peter De Marco, Coxs communications director Honestly, we are looking to see what we can do.On the Sierra Nevada Conservancy, Cox said the new agency will be an important source of funding for watershed restoration and forest management in the area. And he is happy to see local governments represented in the states largest conservancy.While I support the concept of a conservancy, I did not support the first version, said Cox. Now that we have it, we need to expend the effort to make it work.As far as where the job-producing headquarters of the conservancy will land, Cox had one simple opinion.I want the headquarters to be in the first senate district, he said of the area he represents. The boundaries of which stretch from the Oregon border to Mammoth Lakes in the south. Coxs visit signaled that Truckee has a dialogue with their representative in the state capital, Owens said, and means Truckee will be in its senators thoughts as he makes decisions in Sacramento. I think that when a legislator comes up and spends the time … opportunity may knock when he is doing his job at the state capital and Truckee and eastern Nevada County may come to mind, said Owens.