When Wanderlust goes Hollywood | SierraSun.com

When Wanderlust goes Hollywood

Ryan SlabaughSierra Sun

Ryan Slabaugh/Sierra SunThe push to bring Yoga and music together means mass marketing, and Frank Fitzpatrick might just be the right guy.

Frank Fitzpatrick looks like a movie star. On Saturday at Wanderlust, a music and yoga festival at Squaw, Fitzpatrick sat on a couch with a glass of chardonnay, hair long enough for Hollywood, and sunglasses for the silver screen. A few tie-dye dresses and belly dancers swung around nearby, waltzing to an invisible beat.Fitzpatrick, from Santa Monica, took it all in as he talked about his mission: to bring yoga and music together for the betterment of society.andamp;#8220;I decided about three years ago to shift my work in Hollywood,andamp;#8221; he said. He created soundtracks for movies like Friday and Scary Movie 3, and is working on a new project called andamp;#8220;Beat the Worldandamp;#8221; andamp;#8212; a dance movie, but one that incorporates Yoga and music. andamp;#8220;I figured I understood how to reach millions of people, and as a Yogi, it just made sense to combine the two.andamp;#8221;But Yoga and mainstream don’t always blend well, even though the Honey Brothers andamp;#8212; starring Entourage star Adrian Grenier andamp;#8212; performed at the inaugural Wanderlust last year. This conflict is something Fitzpatrick is the first to admit, especially when his message is andamp;#8220;healing the world through music.andamp;#8221;andamp;#8220;There is a prejudice against big media and television,andamp;#8221; he said. andamp;#8220;That television is bad. But if I want to reach 85 million kids, then I have to be on Nickelodeon on Saturday morning. Some people think Nickelodeon is evil, but it’s still the best way for us.andamp;#8221;He’s not kidding about wanting to reach millions of children. Putting Yoga in schools is something the Earth Tones, as well as this music and film producer, want to accomplish. But that will take years andamp;#8212; andamp;#8220;Hinduism is not always acceptable to bring into schools,andamp;#8221; he said. In fact, Fitzpatrick added, it could take a generation.andamp;#8220;These kids are growing up on Yoga,andamp;#8221; he said. andamp;#8220;They will want it taught to their kids, is our hope.andamp;#8221;A music CD is also helping his cause. Called andamp;#8220;Yoga Revolutionandamp;#8221; and featuring artists like Sara McLachlan, Ziggy Marley, Michael Franti and Sting, the sales are hoping to generate excitement for his cause.andamp;#8220;It’s a lot of favors to get them all together,andamp;#8221; he joked. andamp;#8220;But it’s worth it. We have to reach a mass audience. Just like we’ll never solve hunger and we’ll never have world peace, this tunnel does not have an end.andamp;#8221;Fitzpatrick then ended the conversation. A friend walked by and invited him into a talk about music’s role in Yoga, a topic Fitzpatrick couldn’t miss. He sipped his wine, and continued the mission.Learn more at http://www.earthtones.org.