Bear report | SierraSun.com

Bear report

For those of you who insist on leaving garbage out so the bears can get at it (even though that’s illegal and environmentally incorrect), the very least you can do is to drop some Lunesta or Ambien in it. It’s past their bedtime and the rest of us really want them to go to sleep. Bears go into the den because of lack of food or difficulty in obtaining it, not because the weather turns cold. This is also the time when homeowners might notice signs of nest building under crawl spaces. Bears will break branches off trees and carry them under a house in order to make a big comfortable bed to sleep in. If you think this is happening at your house, please call the BEAR League for help in discouraging the new tenant before he remodels the heat vents and plumbing pipes.

Talmont wins the award for the most bear activity this past week. A medium-sized brown male has entered several homes in search of food left inside after the homeowners closed up for the winter. As is usually the case, the homes were not occupied and the windows were single-pane. It helps to place open containers of PineSol inside the windows and to leave a light or two on, although the best way to avoid having problems is to remove all the food.

A young bear has gone into two homes in the Pineland neighborhood this week. Both homes were empty with food left inside and had single-pane windows.

Tahoe City and just south has been visited by a 200-pound bear who has gone into several empty homes and has looked into windows with people inside. He runs off quickly when he sees anyone, but breaks single-pane windows if he thinks the house is uninhabited. If you see him on your deck, please pound on the window and yell, which tells him you will defend your home and not allow him to come inside.

Two yearling cubs were raiding an open Dumpster in Tahoe City just before daylight. They were frightened up a tree where they were forced to spend the rest of the day due to traffic, people with cameras, and dogs. Numerous residents and vacationers called the BEAR League to make sure they were OK. League personnel were on the scene and kept watch over the bears until it was safe to let them come down. BEAR League volunteers then escorted them back into the woods.

The BEAR League is available to help with bear problems or concerns at 525-7297 or bearsnsquirrels@sbcglobal.net.