EArth Day starts at Sierra Nevada College | SierraSun.com

EArth Day starts at Sierra Nevada College

staff report

A series of environmental and conservation inspired short films and animated features will be shown at the Croon Theater at Sierra Nevada College.

The film series will be presented Friday, April 19, from 7 to 10 p.m.

Sierra Nevada College is located at 999 Tahoe Blvd in Incline Village.

Turtle World (9 min)

A powerful allegory about the survivability of homo sapiens. In this highly acclaimed animated film, a lone sea turtle travels through space, her breath creating a whole new atmosphere. This becomes filled with forests, rivers, mountains and enterprising monkeys . . . so enterprising that they are forced to learn about sustainability the hard way.

In the Light of Reverence (23 min partial viewing)

A stunning portrait of land-use conflicts over Native American sacred sites on public and private land around the West. We will screen the section on the Lakota and Mato Tipila (“Lodge of the Bear”), otherwise known as Devils Tower in Wyoming, where issues concerning climbing parallel our own local situation with the Washoe and Cave Rock.

The Significance of Salmon (12 min)

Ecologist Bob Furstenberg looks at how humans have pushed salmon out of the habitat on which they depend. Salmon have always spent their lives facing incredible odds, but today pollution, development, poor logging practices, runoff from farmland, indiscriminate water use, over-fishing, dams, and climate change are proving to be too much for the salmon’s survival.

Green Animation (23 min)

A compilation of short, fresh animated films about environmental issues. Under the sponsorship of the World Wide Fund for Nature in the UK, animators and musicians- some student, some professional – combine talents to prompt laughter, anger, indignation and action for an ecologically sound future.

The Man Who Planted Trees (30 min)

Academy Award Winner- Best Animated Film 1987. This timeless film tells the inspirational story of a solitary shepherd who patiently plants and nurtures a forest of thousands of trees, single-handedly transforming his arid surroundings into a thriving oasis. Undeterred by two world wars, and without any thought of personal reward, the shepherd tirelessly sows his seeds and acorns with the greatest care. As if by magic, a landscape that seemed condemned grows green again. A film of great beauty and hope, this story is a remarkable parable for all ages and an inspiring testament to the power of one person. The author, Jean Giono, created the story “to make people love the tree, or more precisely, to make them love planting trees”, and to pay homage to the kind of unselfish individuality that leaves a positive mark on our planet.

The Witness (43 min) Directed by Jenny Stein

Volume 1 of the Animal People Anthology; a ‘Tribe of Heart’ documentary

Interweaving laughter and sobriety, [Eddie] traces his evolution from a meat-eating, Camel smoker (two packs a day, unfiltered) with a mild disdain for animals, to a vegan and animal advocate–who quit smoking in order to save animals from his second-hand smoke. Deceptively simple, the film works on many levels, providing such easy and deep access to “animal consciousness” that it ranks among the most effective cinematic tools for social change to date. Its debut at [the] Canyonlands Film Festival earned The Witness the award for best documentary.