Letters to the editor | SierraSun.com

Letters to the editor

Sierra Sun

Support voiced for Soda Springs post office service

To the editor:

I would like to comment on the letters regarding Soda Springs Post Office. I have had a box there for several years and have not ever had a problem with the people working there. I am not sure if the complaint was directed toward the postal employees or just the slow mail (the employees at Soda Springs are not responsible for that). I want to express support to the Soda Springs employees.

Mary Jones

Soda Springs

To the editor:

This is in response to the letter published a few weeks ago from Lori Van Meter. She’s had a box in Soda Springs for eight years. Another newcomer.

When my family moved up to Norden in 1968 we used to go down to what was called the Norden store where our now-postmistress used to work. We used to buy candy from her in the early ’70s.

When Mary Hanns started working in the post office almost 30 years ago, she began her postal career in Norden where my family got its mail. When I moved to Soda Springs in the late seventies and postmaster Perkins died, the postal service had to consolidate the Norden post office with the Soda Springs post office. Naturally Mary was the best choice, being fully trained and never having broken a regulation.

Today, I must say that the post office may need remodeling, but reforming? For Pete’s sake! How about nearly 30 years of faithful, honest and hardworking loyalty to the U.S. mail, no matter how bad they treat Soda Springs. Soda Springs is the red-headed stepchild of a post office, last on the route from Sacramento. I (a newcomer in the eyes of some who have been here since God made the trees) have never had a missing, late or damaged article of mail.

Mary may be gruff and tell it like it is but I guarantee this is one postmistress who is not dishonest and is very good at her job. Yes, we haven’t got enough boxes to rent. Is that her fault? Yes, we are the last stop on the block. Maybe the problem isn’t the post office at all.

Know this: I will keep my post office box in Soda Springs until Mary is retired. And thank you, Mary, for your years of excellent and dedicated service to our community and the U.S. post office.

Matt Williams

Soda Springs

Northstar housing plan isn’t sensible

To the editor:

As a voting resident of Placer County, a resident of Northstar-at-Tahoe, and a member of ASDAN (the Association for Sensible Development at Northstar), I felt compelled to write regarding proposed development at Northstar and specifically the so-called employee housing project.

While Northstar board members have “approved” this employee housing (without, I believe, all the proper information), there is a sizeable minority of residents D like myself D that believe the board is misguided and being unduly influenced by developers from out-of-state who have come to Tahoe for one reason and one reason only: to make money.

As one of the region’s proponents of sensible development, ASDAN is committed to creating a plan that equally protects our wilderness resources and maintains a high quality of life for all. The central issue is that the current piecemeal approach to development must be subverted and Placer County needs to address development on a region-wide basis, which includes the Town of Truckee, Nevada County and the Lake Tahoe Basin as participants in the planning process.

Therefore, while I and other residents like myself are not part of this lawsuit, we applaud the efforts of ASDAN and other homeowners at Northstar and others who support a sensible development process.

Thank God someone in this region has the stamina to stand up D with a lawsuit such as the one filed by ASDAN D to those who would pave over paradise.

David Landis

Northstar/San Francisco

Employee housing at Northstar a good idea

To the editor:

The article on Jan. 10 concerning the affordable employee housing project at Northstar-at-Tahoe was inaccurate and offers a portrayal of Northstar homeowners that is exactly the opposite of the truth.

The largest and most representative organization at Northstar is the Northstar Property Owners Association (NPOA). All homeowners elect that body and, although we may have spirited elections, we are united on this issue. You have offered the name of one person who is suing to stop the project. He may have some allies, but NPOA represents about 1,400 property owners.

When the East West projects were first announced NPOA formed the Northstar Development Advisory Committee with members from every condo association and neighborhood within Northstar to thoroughly investigate development plans, find those areas which were troublesome to existing owners, and work to fix them. The committee has been meeting with East West, Northstar ski area, county planners, local government, architects, builders and anyone else who could help to define and improve the project, including people who just opposed everything. I am a member of the committee and I have been going to these meetings for nearly two years. The person who is suing went to very few.

We recognized the need for affordable employee housing and carefully investigated all the claims and counterclaims. In the end the committee unanimously recommended that Northstar homeowners support the project. That was followed by a unanimous vote of the NPOA Board of Directors to send a letter to the Placer County Board of Supervisors in favor of the affordable housing project.

We understand that there are a lot of plans for future development. We are continuing our work to analyze these plans, find where there are problems, and improve them. We believe our work will lead to a better Northstar than if we did nothing.

It is clear that the employee affordable housing project stands on its own. It is a good idea, and has little to do with future plans with the exception that the housing project driveway may at some time connect to a future road. That is not sufficient reason to claim it is a ruse to hide future development. More likely the lawsuit is a ruse to simply stop any and all change at Northstar. I’m sure there will be more lawsuits like it in the future. They will cause delay and additional expense, and in the end accomplish nothing.

Stuart Feigin

Northstar

Good deed went unrewarded

To the editor:

It was Thursday, Jan. 3 of the new year, about 1:45 in the afternoon. After avoiding the Truckee Safeway store for that week, I finally needed to get some groceries in the house. I was lucky enough to get a parking space in front of the Bookshelf at Hooligan Rocks.

As I was parking there was a shopping cart in front of my truck with a purse left in it. I looked around and didn’t see anyone who looked like they were looking for a lost purse. As I approached the purse there was a huge Safeway receipt hanging out of it. There was also a lot of money flowing out of it.

As I looked around my evil conscience said “Take the purse.” Being a single mom, raising a handicapped son, my bills are overwhelming. I saw at least two of those bills getting paid with the money I saw coming out of that purse. On the other hand my good conscience said “Take the purse and return it to Safeway.” Well the good conscience won and I did return the purse to the customer service department at Safeway.

Before I gave them the purse I left a note in it to say who I am and how they could contact me and to let them know all things were returned safely intact. When I called Safeway later that night the purse had been retrieved, hopefully by its rightful owner.

Well, it’s been two weeks and there have been no calls to say “Thank you.” I’ve had my wallet stolen before and the money is relative. It’s all the other belongings that are of value.

I can only hope the owner of that purse reads this letter to the editor or hears about it and her own good conscience kicks inE

Lynn Shortridge

Truckee