Readers write | SierraSun.com

Readers write

I am writing in response to your front page article regarding wheelchair accessibility in North Lake Tahoe (A tough road Sierra Sun June 9). I have become increasingly aware of limited access, particularly at River View Sports Park in Truckee, where my sons Little League games take place and where a team mom is unable to access the field in her wheelchair.This is particularly disturbing when one considers River View was constructed after the Americans with Disabilities ACT, and even more appalling when one learns that when the Truckee-Donner Recreation & Parks District was made aware of the situation, the mother was told there were no funds available to correct the problem. How can we, as a community, accept this response from the recreation and parks department? Especially when one considers the many dollars available for building a brand new facility, when they have not yet complied with the law at River View? According to the article’s statistics, it is not just my friend who is unable to watch her child play Little League; there are many others in our community who are affected by this lack of access.The recreation and parks department must be held accountable for making the baseball field at River View Sports Park wheelchair accessible before the end of this season. I look forward to the day that my friend can get out of her van and wheel on down to the field to watch her son play ball. Raine HoweTruckee

I read with dismay in the Sierra Sun of the plans to close the auto shop at North Tahoe High School. I think that this would be a tremendous mistake.Im 66 years old, currently retired and selling real estate here at North Lake Tahoe. As a young, failing high school student in Berkeley, auto shop and typing were the two courses that gave me the background and knowledge that allowed me to be a productive member of society.I graduated high school, and after a year and a half of junior college, entered the workforce as a service station attendant and mechanic; working in that industry for 15 years using the skills I learned in high school auto shop. In my mid-30s, I found a job as a factory representative for an auto parts manufacturer, and worked in this profession climbing the corporate ladder until retirement and earning a six-figure income.If I had not had the education that I received in high school auto shop, I would never have been able to take advantage of those opportunities. Auto shop gave me the skills to be a productive member of society.Today, a young person with the knowledge gained from his high school auto shop classes has the opportunity to find a job. The industry is crying for qualified people and there are jobs available in several areas tire shop, repair shop, specialty shops and dealerships. If, in addition to the basic knowledge gained in his shop class, the student has some electronics background and understands computers, he can become a diagnostic technician. Now his future, and earning potential, is unlimited. High school auto shop can give him these skills.Doug GompertzKings Beach

When I first read about the new recreation centers master plan back in February I wrote a letter harshly questioning the phasing of the development. Since then I have been attending Truckee-Donner Recreation & Parks Department (TDRPD) board meetings, and I have been pleasantly surprised. The board did listen to feedback from the community and did give serious consideration to funding issues. Instead of stubbornly digging their heels in, they quickly reworked the master plan into a logical sequence that fits our community. I wont steal their thunder by describing it here, TDRPD will be rolling that out very soon. My compliments to the TDRPD board and management for their ability to listen, quickly adapt, and move on towards execution. While the lingering paid parking debacle, among other things, has caused many people I speak with to lose faith in our town government, I am pleased to report that TDRPD at least is still working for us citizens. Mark Miller Truckee