Readers Write | SierraSun.com

Readers Write

I would like to thank Bryan DeVoe and Ryan Matt for their letters in your Feb. 5 Sierra Sun. It’s refreshing to see their opinion and hopefully the opinion of many other finally expressed in the face of all this development. When I lived in Glenshire, I often wished there was a path that went to town, but never for a moment did I think it should be paved. Kids have dirt bikes as a rule, not road bikes. Jogging is best done on soft ground; it’ll save your knees! As for the “Wild and Wiley” article, shame on Ann Bryant for being such a wonderful advocate for bears, yet in the same breath saying coyotes are disposable, “We don’t have to feel sorry for them.”

The bottom line is that we live in the mountains. Animals coexisted very well before humans encroached in their environment. We chose to live here and it would be wrong to try to change the environment to meet the needs of those who are perhaps not adjusted to this area. If you don’t like dirt or wildlife, please feel free to live elsewhere. In the words of the late Ronnie Van Zant, “I can see the concrete slowly creepin’, Lord take me and mine before that comes.”

Lori Tucker

Truckee

I just heard the Truckee Tahoe Airport is considering the purchase of a flight simulator to help pilots with their training. This is the best idea to come out of the airport in years. I say “go for it.” $500,000 of the tax payers money is a small price to pay for some peace and quiet. I realize that pilots want to fly their planes. So go someplace. Don’t just fly it around and around and around over our neighborhoods for practice. I realize they have to do it sometime but a flight simulator makes good sense since it could drastically reduce the number of touch-and-goes.

The flight simulator uses no fuel, generates no noise and puts no pollutants into the air. The airport folks have a responsibility to take steps to reduce the impacts on our community. I don’t want to hear, “The Airport was here first” because it wasn’t. Truckee was here long before the airport.

Congratulations to the Airport staff for being concerned about the impacts from the airport on our neighborhoods.

Lynne Larson

Truckee

On Feb. 16, we arrived at our Donner Lake vacation home at about 4:30 p.m. from our home in San Luis Obispo. Our two border collie dogs, Lilly and Cisco were with us and after being in the car for nearly seven hours were excited about getting out. As we unpacked, the dogs ran about on the road. Then we noticed they weren’t in sight and we began calling. There was no response. After a few minutes, Lilly appeared, soaking wet. We realized they must have ran down to frozen Donner Lake and fell through the ice.

We hurried to the lake calling Cisco and there was a call returned from people down at the water, further to the east end of the lake. The call was that they had our dog Cisco, and he had almost drowned. There was a young man in a kayak out in the frozen lake and five people on the shore wiping Cisco down with towels. They indicated the dogs had run on the lake and fell through the ice and would have drowned had it not been for the young man in the kayak who broke his way through the ice to rescue them.

He got to Lilly and was able to lift her up on the ice and she ran to land, and he towed Cisco to shore through the icy water where people helped get him to land and worked to dry his trembling body. We’re so lucky the kayaker happened to be there, as he was the only boat in sight on the lake, and that the people were on their pier and that all were willing to help rescue our two wonderful pets. Without their help, we would have surely lost Lilly and Cisco.

We didn’t get the name of the kayaker, who after the rescue paddled back across the frozen lake through a crack in the ice. Without his help, our pets would have surely died that afternoon. We’d like to thank him again for his thoughtful efforts.

Vaughan and Pat Hitchcock

San Luis Obispo/Donner Lake