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60th Anniversary: John and Jean Sproehnle

John and Jean Sproehnle are celebrating their 60th wedding anniversary July 3. They fell in love and were married at Carmel by the Sea soon after meeting at the 1960 Winter Olympics. 
The couple met at the 1960 Olympics in Squaw Valley. She worked at the Squaw Valley Inn. This is her standing next to a pair of Head skis with cable bindings.
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John and Jean Sproehnle with children Rob, Christine and Lisa.
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The Sproehnle family lived in a tall house with epic views, surrounded by giant Jeffry pines, just below a rockslide. Mom grew tomatoes every summer on the porch and the family always had dogs, cats, bears, and kids boarding. 
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At the time, there were only a handful of restaurants at Tahoe, so John and Jean Sproehnle decided to open the Hearthstone Steak, Spirits & Rib House.
They served the Hearthstone’s Famous Spareribs, giant steaks for $9.95, and foil-wrapped “bakers.” A huge plate from the salad bar was only $2.50. The baseball teams were the Truckin’ Tomatoes and the Hearthstone Heavies.

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The whole family in the Meadow, four grown grandchildren included.
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LOOK UP IN THE SKY: Truckee Tahoe Air Show plans 4th of July 2020 Honor Flyover

Editor’s note: There is no event at the Truckee Tahoe Airport. Planes are not on display, in adherence to COVID-19 guidelines against large gatherings.

A planned “parade in the sky” of military aircraft will feature the D-Day Squadron whose commemorative flyover missions continue throughout the nation, the last one covering over four Southern California counties on Memorial Day. The squadron plans to fly six DC-3 (C-47s) historic warbirds over Truckee Tahoe communities as a special gift supported by the Truckee Airport District.

The flyover is scheduled to begin at 11 a.m. and will cover Truckee Tahoe communities flying over Tahoe Forest Hospital, all four shores of Lake Tahoe, Barton Medical Center in South Lake Tahoe, Incline Village, Tahoe City, Squaw Valley and back to Truckee. The mission stretching 130 miles is expected to finish by 12:30 p.m. The lead aircraft for this mission is Gooney Bird Group Betsy’s Biscuit Bomber C-47, piloted by U.S. Navy veteran Sherman Smoot and Scott Stelzle. The progression will end with an Aeoranautica of Romania, IAR-823, Zlin “pulling up the rear.”

The flight path graphic is forthcoming and will publish on the Truckee Tahoe Air Show & Family Festival social media pages. 

“Considering we had to make the decision to cancel the 2020 Air Show & Family Festival due to the COVID-19 Pandemic, the Airport District Board supported funding an honor flyover as a gift to our community to celebrate July 4th with a parade of planes in the sky,” noted Tim LoDolce, executive director, Truckee Tahoe Air Show.

The Truckee Tahoe Airport complies with Nevada and Placer County Health Department guidelines to not have large public gatherings at the airport. Please note that aircraft WILL NOT BE ON DISPLAY.

“We’re encouraging residents to look up as these radial engines roar above to honor and celebrate our nation’s independence and COVID-19 frontline workers,” noted LoDolce. “Grab a lawn chair, some friends, and view the parade of planes to happen overhead!”

The 4th of July Truckee Tahoe Honor Flyover features D-Day Squadron aircraft Betsy’s Biscuit Bomber C-47 leading D-Day Doll C-53 of the Commemorative Air Force’s Inland Empire Wing (IEW), Legend Foundation’s Legend ‘Liberty’ Airways C-47, Mission Boston, LLC’s Virginia Ann C-47, Benovia Winery’s Spirit of Benovia C-53, and What’s Up Doc C-47 of the Palm Springs Air Museum.

D-Day Squadron launched from Oxford, Connecticut’s KOXC airport on May 19, 2019 for their “Mission to Normandy.”  They successfully crossed the North Atlantic with 15 C-47 type aircraft, completing multiple paratrooper drops and a Presidential flyover for the US and French First Families while participating in events including the 75th anniversary of the Normandy landings, the 70th anniversary of the Berlin Airlift, and commemorations in the U.S., U.K., France, Germany and Italy spanning most of June 2019.

About the D-Day Squadron

The D-Day Squadron is the part of the Tunison Foundation, a non-profit 501(c)(3) charitable organization. It is currently in process of becoming a DC-3 society to promote DC-3 type aircraft airworthiness, serve members and promote static and flying displays for future generations. Its mission will educate and involve the next generation in “flying freedom” and celebrate everything the DC-3 has accomplished in war and peace.

In June 2019, the D-Day Squadron led an American fleet of 15 historic, restored C-47 World War II military aircraft to take part in a flyover of more than 30 international aircraft to drop over 200 paratroopers over the original 1944 drop zones in Normandy commemorating the 75th anniversary of D-Day. The event honored the citizen soldiers of the War, whose bravery led the Allies to the liberation of France, and then to an end of the devastating War in Europe. The Squadron’s education program takes the compelling story of the citizen soldier to audiences at airshows and events off the flight line to honor these brave Americans and ensure their memory and significance is appreciated for generations to come. The group’s efforts are funded through the generous tax-deductible contribution of their supporters. Learn more at DDaySquadron.org.

RICHARD BAILEY

Richard “Dick” Bailey Nov. 9, 1934-June 25, 2019 June 25, 2020, marked the day that Richard “Dick” Bailey took his last breath and passed from this world into the arms of his Savior Jesus Christ. Dick was born November 9, 1934 in East Cleveland, Ohio. Dick was the second of four children, including Barbara, Audrey and Quintin to Hinton and Ruth Bailey. Dick attended Ohio State and Western Reserve University. As an architecture student, he paid for college classes working for an Ohio architecture firm. In the mid 1960s, Dick was able to utilize his architecture expertise in Vail, Colorado and designed several of the original buildings in downtown Vail as well as many of the town’s single-family homes. A door opened in the mid- 1970s for Dick to transition into the development world. Berry Creek Ranch in Edwards, Colorado was the first golf course development in which Dick participated, followed by Desert Highlands and Forest Highlands in Arizona. Encouraged to fly small airplanes in his 20s from his father who was an amateur pilot, Dick perfected his piloting skills while living in Vail and bought his first airplane. After moving to Arizona and marrying Susan Sneed in 1984, the couple enjoyed many recreational trips flying to places around the country to ski, play golf and sail in Dick’s beloved Beach Duke. In 1991 Dick made another professional transition and decided to utilize his experience in the field with some of the world’s best golf course designers and become part of their elite club forming Dick Bailey Design. The 18-hole putting course at Martis Camp in Truckee, California and Whitehawk Ranch in Clio, California are two of his best-known courses in the state. Dick and Susan had their only child, Ryan Hunter Bailey in 1985. Dick expressed many times that having a son was one of the greatest joys of his life. An avid reader, Dick often read books to Ryan when he was a child. That pleasure of sharing stories continued when the two adult men would discuss a chosen book and talk on the telephone about their thoughts and impressions. A move from Arizona to Truckee in 2010 opened a new chapter where the couple became mountain residents and employees of Martis Camp, a local real estate golf development. Soon after the move, Dick began attending a men’s Bible study at Sierra Bible Church in Truckee. During one of the sessions he admitted that he always thought he was responsible for his accomplishments, but realized it was God who gave him the talents and abilities to do all the things he enjoyed, both in sports and business. This recognition prompted Dick to be baptized in front of the entire church body at Donner Lake in 2014. A devoted husband, father, uncle and friend, Dick will be remembered for his quiet, kind and engaging personality that enchanted many people during his 86 years on earth. His love of basketball, golf, skiing, and flying airplanes as well as his infectious, welcoming smile became his trademarks to those who came to know and love him. As a Christian believer, his family and friends are happy to know that Dick now resides in heaven with his Creator.

Nevada County has 129 COVID-19 cases

UPDATE on July 3, 2020

Nevada County now has recorded 129 confirmed cases of COVID-19, an increase by six from 24 hours earlier.

Eighty five of the cases have been confirmed in eastern Nevada County, with an additional 44 in western Nevada County — five more cases from prior reporting. A total 14 cases have been confirmed in the Grass Valley’s 95945 zip code.

Forty five of the cases across the county are reported as active.

Eighty-three cases have recovered, while one person has died.

Countywide a total of 7,070 tests have been administered.

According to the county’s coronavirus dashboard, California now has 250,514 cases confirmed statewide, with 6,315 deaths.

The United States has confirmed 2,793,435 cases with 790,404 recoveries and 129,432 deaths.

Nevada County’s total number of coronavirus cases inched up by three on Tuesday, bringing the total to 116.

There are 38 cases in western county, and 78 in eastern county. Thirty-two of the cases remain active, and 83 have recovered. There has been one death.

There have been 7,070 tests administered in the county.

COVID-19 cases have steadily increased since June began. There were 41 cases throughout May. They grew to 50 by June 8, and 55 by June 15. They’ve more than doubled since.

There are 226,851 cases in California and 6,013 deaths.

Nationwide, there are 2,629,372 cases and 127,322 deaths. There have been 720,631 recoveries.

UPDATE on July 2, 2020

Nevada County gained six new coronavirus cases on Thursday, bringing its total to 123.

Forty of the cases are in western county, and 83 in eastern county. There are 39 active cases. Eighty-three patients have recovered. One person has died.

There have been 7,070 tests given in the county.

COVID-19 cases have been on a steady climb since mid-June.

On June 16 there were 57 cases. On June 23 there were 92 cases. By Tuesday the number had grown to 116, climbing by one to 117 on Wednesday.

There are 242,856 cases in the state, and 6,208 deaths.

Nationwide, there are 2,735,339 cases and 128,677 deaths. There have been 781,970 recoveries.

UPDATE on July 1, 2020

Nevada County’s total number of COVID-19 cases grew by one on Wednesday, bringing the new total to 117.

There are 36 cases in western county, and 81 in eastern county. The county has 33 active cases. Eighty-three patients have recovered. There has been one death.

There have been 7,070 tests given in the county.

The number of coronavirus cases has spiked since mid-June. On June 16 there were 57 cases. On June 23 there were 92 cases. That grew to 108 by Sunday, 113 by Monday and 116 on Tuesday.

There are 237,019 cases in the state and 6,152 deaths.

Nationwide, there are 2,682,270 cases and 128,028 deaths. There have been 729,994 recoveries.

UPDATE on June 30, 2020

Nevada County’s total COVID-19 case number grew to 113 on Monday, a rise of five from reporting on Friday

There are now 77 cases in eastern county and 36 cases in western county.

Positive cases have grown quickly in June. The county had 41 cases throughout May.

There are 29 active cases in the county. Eighty-three people have recovered. There has been one death.

There have been 7,070 tests performed in the county.

California has 216,550 cases and 5,936 deaths, as of June 28.

Nationwide, there are 2,545,250 cases and 126,369 deaths.

Afternoon UPDATE on June 25, 2020

Nevada County on Thursday hit 101 coronavirus cases, reports state.

The climb of 10 from Wednesday is the second time the county has seen a double-digit daily increase. June 17 also saw an increase of 10.

There are 30 cases in western county, and 71 in eastern county.

The county had 41 cases throughout May, seeing a sharp increase this month.

There are 23 active cases, with 77 people recovered. There has been one death.

There have been 5,643 tests performed locally.

California has 197,589 cases and 5,751 deaths.

Nationwide, there are 2,452,567 cases and 125,796 deaths. There have been 663,562 recoveries.

UPDATE for June 25, 2020

Nevada County has revised its number of coronavirus cases to 91.

“As case investigations are conducted, we receive updated demographic information and will update that on our dashboard,” said Taylor Wolfe, an administrative analyst with the county, in an email.

The county has once before revised its COVID-19 number, when it discovered a patient didn’t live in Nevada County.

Afternoon UPDATE on June 25, 2020

Nevada County on Thursday hit 101 coronavirus cases, reports state.

The climb of 10 from Wednesday is the second time the county has seen a double-digit daily increase. June 17 also saw an increase of 10.

There are 30 cases in western county, and 71 in eastern county.

The county had 41 cases throughout May, seeing a sharp increase this month.

There are 23 active cases, with 77 people recovered. There has been one death.

There have been 5,643 tests performed locally.

California has 197,589 cases and 5,751 deaths.

Nationwide, there are 2,452,567 cases and 125,796 deaths. There have been 663,562 recoveries.

UPDATE for June 23, 2020

Nevada County now has 92 coronavirus cases, a jump of 10 from Monday.

Western county has 27 cases, and eastern county has 65.

Cases have spiked since June 1, when the county had 42. They grew to 50 by June 8, and 55 by June 15.

COVID-19 cases have grown by almost 40 since then.

There are 23 active cases, and 68 recoveries. There’s been one death.

There have been 5,643 tests performed locally.

California has 187,351 cases and 5,578 deaths.

Nationwide, there are 2,342,739 cases and 121,176 deaths. The number of recoveries is 647,548.

UPDATE on June 22, 2020

Nevada County on Monday identified its 82nd COVID-19 case, an increase of seven from Friday.

Fifty-eight of those cases are in eastern county. The other 24 are in western county.

The recent spike is the latest in a series of increases that began early this month.

The county had 42 cases on June 1, 50 on June 8 and 55 on June 15. The biggest jump in positive cases happened last Wednesday, when the county identified 10 new coronavirus patients in one day.

There are 26 active cases, and 55 recoveries. There has been one death.
There have been 5,643 COVID-19 tests performed locally.

California has 179,606 cases and 5,524 deaths.

Nationwide, there are 2,306,247 cases and 120,351 deaths. The number of recoveries is 640,198.

UPDATE on June 19, 2020

As of Friday, there are now 75 COVID-19 cases in Nevada County.

The county’s 55 cases on Monday inched up two on Tuesday, and climbed by another 10 on Wednesday for a total of 67. Four more cases were identified Thursday, with another four on Friday.

Eastern county has 54 cases. Western county has 21.

Fifty-one of the county’s cases have recovered. There are 23 active cases, and one death.

There have been 4,286 coronavirus tests performed in the county.

California has 169,695 cases, and 5,408 deaths.

Nationwide, there are 2,219,119 cases, and 119,086 deaths. The number of recoveries is 606,715.

UPDATE on June 18, 2020

There are now 71 COVID-19 cases in Nevada County.

The county’s 55 cases on on Monday inched up two on Tuesday, and climbed by another 10 on Wednesday for a total of 67. Four more cases were identified Thursday.

Eastern county has 51 cases. Western county has 20.

Fifty-one of the county’s cases have recovered. There are 19 active cases, and one death.

There have been 4,286 coronavirus tests performed in the county.

California has 164,841 cases, and 5,306 deaths.

Nationwide, there are 2,185,873 cases, and 118,334 deaths. The number of recoveries is 599,115.

UPDATE on June 17, 2020

There are now 67 COVID-19 cases in Nevada County.

The county’s 55 cases on Monday inched up two on Tuesday, and climbed by another 10 on Wednesday for a total of 67.

Eastern county has 47 cases. Western county has 20.

Fifty of the county’s cases have recovered. There are 16 active cases, and one death.

There have been 4,286 coronavirus tests performed in the county.

California has 162,079 cases, and 5,255 deaths.

Nationwide, there are 2,161,593 cases, and 117,694 deaths. The number of recoveries is 592,191.

UPDATE on June 17:

There are now 57 COVID-19 cases in Nevada County.

UPDATE on June 16:

There are now 55 COVID-19 cases in Nevada County, with 14 in western county and 41 in eastern county.

There are four active cases, though the county has not reported the location of those that remain active. Fifty cases have recovered. There has been one death.

UPDATE on June 8:

There are now 50 COVID-19 cases in Nevada County, with 12 in western county and 38 in eastern county.

There are seven active cases. Forty-two cases have recovered. There has been one death.

UPDATE June 4:

Nevada County is reporting 49 confirmed cases of COVID-19. The new case is in eastern county.

UPDATE June 2:

After going a month with no new cases, Nevada County saw seven new COVID-19 cases over two days this week.

The county now has recorded 48 cases of COVID-19. The seven new cases are in eastern county.

Records show that six of the cases are active, and 41 of them have recovered. There has been one death.

There have been 3,346 tests performed in the county.

Nevada County recorded its first case on March 16. At first the numbers climbed quickly, reaching 34 cases by April 7. The number reached 41 on April 29, holding steady until Monday, when it climbed to 42. Six new cases appeared Tuesday.

Across the state, 117,215 cases have been recorded. There have been 4,306 deaths as of Tuesday, county records show.

Nationwide, there have been 1,831,435 cases and 106,180 deaths. There have been 463,868 recoveries, records state.

UPDATE on May 6, 2020

Nevada County has 41 cases of COVID-19, with 12 in western county and 29 in eastern county. It has zero active cases, 40 recoveries and one death.

UPDATE on April 29, 2020

Nevada County now has 41 cases of COVID-19, with 12 in western county and 29 in eastern county.

UPDATE on April 24, 2020

Officials said they determined two cases were confirmed to be in nearby counties, hence the drop from 38 to 36.

UPDATE on April 21, 2020

Nevada County Public Health has confirmed its 38th COVID-19 case, an increase of two since the weekend.

There are 26 people in eastern Nevada County with the coronavirus, and 12 on the western side.

“As additional people are diagnosed with COVID-19, we will report the number of confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Nevada County on the County’s www.mynevadacounty.com/coronavirus website,” Nevada County Public Information Officer Taylor Wolfe wrote in press release.

“As we anticipate seeing an increase in diagnosed COVID-19 cases in Nevada County due to increased testing availability and the possibility of increased community transmission, the most important message we can keep sharing with our residents is that staying home is the best way to protect yourself and others, and everyone should be following California’s Shelter-at-Home Order,” Wolfe wrote.

UPDATE on April 3, 2020

1st death linked to COVID-19 in Nevada County

Nevada County Public Health is reporting the first Nevada County death related to the COVID-19 pandemic.  The person was an elderly eastern Nevada County resident who had underlying health conditions and previously tested positive for the coronavirus. 

“During this time, our thoughts are with the family, friends and loved ones of the deceased,” said Dr. Ken Cutler, Nevada County public health officer. “This is a tragic reminder of the seriousness of COVID-19. To slow the spread of this virus, we all need to stay inside as much as possible and severely limit person to person interactions, as hard as that is.”

Out of respect for the privacy of the family, Nevada County Public Health is not sharing further details.

Source: Nevada County

Vail Resorts nears 100% renewable electricity goal as large-scale wind farm goes online

Vail Resorts celebrated a major step toward its 100% renewable electricity goal on Wednesday as a new large-scale wind farm, enabled by the company, has gone online.

Vail Resorts, which operates three resorts in the Truckee-Tahoe area, has committed to purchase 310,000 megawatt hours of wind energy annually from the new 82-turbine Plum Creek Wind project, which will address more than 90% of the company’s current electricity use across its 34 North American resorts.

As a part of Vail Resorts’ Commitment to Zero sustainability pledge, the company has a stated goal to reach 100% renewable electricity by 2030.

In 2018, Vail Resorts announced a partnership with global renewable energy leader, Ørsted, via a virtual power purchase agreement to enable the Plum Creek Wind project, based in Wayne County, Nebraska.

“Setting bold operational sustainability goals, and finding innovative ways to reach them, is a priority for us at Vail Resorts,” said Kate Wilson, senior director of sustainability at Vail Resorts. “Along with local efforts, (virtual power purchase agreements) are an important way for large companies to have a measurable impact on climate change. Reaching our Commitment to Zero energy goals will require a multi-pronged strategy and bringing new, renewable energy to the grid is a key way we’ll get there.”

The amount of wind energy Vail Resorts committed to purchase was equivalent to 100% of the company’s North American electricity usage at the time. Since then, Vail has acquired 17 smaller ski areas in the U.S. and now has resorts across 15 states and three countries.

“We are incredibly proud to enable Ørsted’s Plum Creek Wind project and to support the generation of new renewable energy,” said Rob Katz, CEO of Vail Resorts. “This wind energy agreement addresses the majority of the emissions associated with our company’s electricity use. We are thrilled with this progress and remain committed to achieving our 100% renewable electricity goal, even as our company grows.”

Vail Resorts has also committed to investing $25 million in innovative, energy-saving projects between its fiscal year 2017 and fiscal year 2030 in three key areas: snowmaking, buildings, and lifts. During the last two years, the company invested nearly $5 million on these projects, which has included 400 new low-energy snowguns, LED lighting retrofits and updated building controls.

Vail Resorts’ Commitment to Zero pledge is to reach a zero net operating footprint by 2030. This commitment features zero net emissions, which includes 100% renewable electricity; zero waste to landfill; and zero net operating impact to forests and habitat.

Vail Resorts reports on progress around Commitment to Zero annually in its EpicPromise Progress Report. The 2020 Progress Report will be released in October 2020.

Locals know best: Favorite ways to spend summer days around Big Blue

No one knows how to spend an epic summer day in Tahoe better than the people that call this place home.

From the South Shore to Truckee, Tahoe Magazine asked a handful of our accomplished locals how they get out and enjoy Big Blue this time of year, and they delivered.

Lila Lapanja

Professional alpine ski racer, Truckee

“Summer in Tahoe is magical. I capitalize on the few weeks I get at home by being outside, mostly mountain biking, hiking, paddleboarding, and swimming. The West Shore near Homewood and Squaw Valley offer great hikes (such as Blackwood Canyon and Shirley Lake Trail), and you can end your day dining right on the water.

“On another day, explore Tahoe’s North Shore and hike Diamond Peak or the Flume Trail for the best view of the lake anywhere to be found and enjoy a delicious meal at the Soule Domain in Crystal Bay. Regardless of where I go or what I do, I always end up at the same place: the lake. If you’re feeling brave enough, jump in. Swimming in the refreshing Tahoe water is the ultimate experience and one of the feelings I live for.”

McAvoy Laynew

Mark Twain impressionist, Incline Village

“In that most of my friends have been dead for a hundred years, I tend to hunt up living history programs to reunite with them. Reading Tahoe Magazine and communing with the lake are my very favorite things to do. They put a song in my heart and a spring in my step.”

David Polivy

Owner of Tahoe Mountain Sports and Mayor of Truckee

“Being a Truckee resident, my ideal summer day might go something like this: After I pick up a new pair of trail running shoes from Tahoe Mountain Sports, I would head out for a nice trail run on the new section of the Donner Lake Rim Trail, then head down into town and after a quick stop at Alibi Ale Works to fill my growler, I would grab my shade tent and the family and head over to Donner Lake at China Cove Beach or visit the ‘Big Lake’ and hit up Moon Dunes Beach.”

Travis Ganong

Professional alpine ski racer, Tahoe City

“Summer in Tahoe is unbeatable. Our home base is in Tahoe City, so it is really easy for us to sneak down the West Shore for some hikes up into Desolation Wilderness or along the cliffs and deep water pools of the Rubicon Trail. It is also really close for us to take the Truckee River bike path to Squaw Valley and go jump in the amazing swimming holes and play in the waterfalls in Shirley Canyon.

“Going the other direction, we can zip over to the East Shore to enjoy the crystal clear turquoise water, and sunbathe on the white sandy beaches. We also have many amazing local restaurants to enjoy everywhere along the North Shore, but I am most excited for the grand opening of Tahoe National Brewery in Tahoe City this summer. They will have an amazing lakeside outdoor patio. For coffee, Pacific Crest Coffee Company is a local small batch coffee roaster and cafe located in the Pioneer Center in Truckee!”

Matt Levitt

Founder and CEO of Tahoe Blue Vodka, South Lake Tahoe

“What I really love about Tahoe summers are my evenings at the beach. Every night we can, I finish work and grab the kids and head to one of the South Shore’s beaches for a picnic dinner, sunset and swim to cool off. Add the biking and hiking and wakeboarding, I firmly believe there’s no better place in the world than Tahoe during the summer.”

Corey Rich

Lifestyle and adventure photographer/director at Corey Rich Productions, South Lake Tahoe

“One of my favorite things to do in the summer is the really early mountain bike ride. I always say the best mountain bike ride is the one you can do from your back door. I feel so fortunate to live in such an amazing place. My go-to ride is to the Cold Creek Trail to High Meadows. It turns out at 5 in the morning, there aren’t many people out there. In the afternoons, we hang at the beach. It’s one of the amazing aspects of South Lake Tahoe, we have lots of public beaches.

“I enjoy Nevada Beach and Baldwin Beach. For dining, I like to do take-out food and either bring it to the beach or walk up to one of the overlooks at the lake. In our forest surrounding the lake, there are lots of ovTruckeeerlooks that are oftentimes just a few minutes from the road, and you can find those by studying topo maps. There’s something special about being outside watching the sunset with your friends and family.”

This story was first published by Tahoe Magazine, of which the summer edition is available at newsstands in high-traffic areas all around the Tahoe-Truckee communities.

Safety first on the Fourth: Truckee-Tahoe gets innovative for Independence Day

While Fourth of July fireworks shows and festivities may be canceled across the Truckee-Tahoe area, there will be a number of ways for the community and visitors to celebrate Independence Day amid the outbreak of COVID-19.

On Saturday morning, Tahoe Truckee Media will begin broadcasting previous Truckee Fourth of July parades, which will run back-to-back from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Parades can also be viewed online at www.ttctv.org/parades. Tahoe Truckee Media will then air previous live concerts from acts including Mojo Green, Dead Winter Carpenters, Jelly Break, Deckheads, Montana, TAMA, and others.

While Truckee’s traditional Fourth of July parade has been canceled, the Truckee Tahoe Air Show & Family Festival committee and Truckee Tahoe Airport have planned a parade in the sky with military aircraft featuring the D-Day Squadron. The squadron plans to fly six DC-3 (C-47s) historic warbirds over Truckee-Tahoe communities as a special gift supported by the Truckee Airport District.

“Considering we had to make the decision to cancel the 2020 Air Show & Family Festival due to the COVID-19 Pandemic, the Airport District Board supported funding an honor flyover as a gift to our community to celebrate July 4th with a parade of planes in the sky,” Tim LoDolce, Truckee Tahoe Air Show director, said in a news release.

The flyover is scheduled to begin at 11 a.m. and includes Tahoe Forest Hospital, all four shores of Lake Tahoe, Barton Medical Center in South Lake Tahoe, Incline Village, Tahoe City, Squaw Valley and back to Truckee.

The flyover, stretching 130 miles, is expected to finish by 12:30 p.m. The lead aircraft for the flyover, according to officials, will be Gooney Bird Group Betsy’s Biscuit Bomber C-47, piloted by U.S. Navy veteran Sherman Smoot and Scott Stelzle. The progression will end with an aircraft of Romania, an IAR-823, Zlin,

“We’re encouraging residents to look up as these radial engines roar above to honor and celebrate our nation’s independence and COVID-19 frontline workers,” added LoDolce. “Grab a lawn chair, some friends, and view the parade of planes to happen overhead!”

This weekend, Squaw Valley Alpine Meadows has set up a drive-in cinema in the Squaw Valley parking lot. Gates for movie nights, sponsored by North Lake Tahoe, will open at 6 p.m., and movies will start at 8 p.m. Friday’s movie is “Sonic the Hedgehog,” followed by “Sing” on Saturday, and “Field of Dreams” on Sunday.

Cost is $40 per vehicle and must be done in advance at www.squawalpine.com. Takeout and patio dining will also be available from Tremigo Mexican Kitchen & Tequila Bar, Auld Dubliner, Fireside Pizza, Rocker@Squaw, Twenty-Two Bistro, and Wildflour Pop Up.

Milton Merlos and Jeff Jones will also be providing live music in the Village at Squaw Valley on Friday and Saturday. Masks are required to enter the village.

Know Before you go

Ahead of the Fourth of July weekend, Lake Tahoe and Truckee communities are asking travelers to wear face coverings in order to keep businesses open amid an increasing number of positive COVID-19 cases across the country.

Lake Tahoe Visitors Authority, North Lake Tahoe, and Truckee have shared six ways visitors can plan ahead to enjoy a socially distanced weekend.

To help travelers navigate current information across state and county lines, “Know Before You Go” details have been compiled by North Lake Tahoe, South Lake Tahoe, and Truckee, specific to their regions. Visitors are also encouraged to call lodging properties and businesses ahead of time for clarity on individual policies.

If plans for the weekend entail heading to the lake, beach-goers are being encouraged to “spread out on over 40 public beaches.” Info on Tahoe’s beaches can be found at www.tahoepublicbeaches.org. Information on Donner Lake, the Truckee River and reservoirs nearby Truckee can be found at www.truckee.com.

Another way visitors can socially distance is by going on a hike on one of the area’s less traveled trails. Information on local hikes can be found at destination websites for the area — www.gotahoenorth.com, www.tahoesouth.com, and www.truckee.com.

Many of the Truckee-Tahoe area’s trails can be explored on two wheels. From the new East Shore Trail to the Truckee Legacy Trail, the area offers plenty of options for cycling. Make a plan to ride be visiting North Lake Tahoe, South Lake Tahoe or Truckee’s destination websites.

The area’s bodies of water also provide a way to recreate while maintaining social distancing. Whether it’s stand-up paddling, water skiing, or parasailing, Lake Tahoe, Donner Lake, and other bodies of water offer plenty of options for activities this weekend. Rental operators and other information can be found at the destination websites for Truckee, North Tahoe, and South Tahoe.

Lastly, the Truckee-Tahoe area is home to some of the best golf courses in the Sierra. Tee-times can be scheduled this weekend at a variety of mountain courses by finding links at www.gotahoenorth.com, www.tahoesouth.com, and www.truckee.com.

Justin Scacco is a reporter for the Sierra Sun. Contact him at jscacco@sierrasun.com or 530-550-2643.

California Tahoe Conservancy grants $650,000 to relocate, rebuild pier at Kings Beach

The California Tahoe Conservancy recently awarded more than $2 million in grants for projects around Lake Tahoe.

The conservancy board awarded $900,000 to improve lakefront public access and recreation, including giving $650,000 to California State Parks to relocate and rebuild the pier at Kings Beach State Recreation Area.

Another $150,000 was awarded to the Sierra Business Council for outreach and education to paddlers using the Lake Tahoe Water Trail. And $100,000 was given to state parks to improve the Rubicon Trail and facilities near Vikingsholm at Emerald Bay State Park.

The board also approved $676,000 for three grants to California State Parks, the Washoe Tribe of Nevada and California, and the Great Basin Institute to help reduce carbon emissions from forest restoration efforts. The grants will fund the transport of woody biomass from forest thinning projects for bioenergy, wood products, home-heating fuelwood, and other uses.

In South Lake Tahoe, a $425,000 grant was awarded to help plan the future of a 56-acre site, which will become a south shore hub of civic and recreation activity across Highway 50 from Lakeview Commons.

“The 56-acre site is already a vibrant gathering place for community members and visitors alike, and it has the potential to be so much more,” said South Lake Tahoe City Council member and Conservancy Board member Tamara Wallace.

The conservancy’s grant builds upon its $6 million investment in 2010 to partner with South Lake Tahoe and El Dorado County to construct Lakeview Commons, the city’s local gathering area. The most recent grant will provide funding for the city to partner with the county and the local community to complete a master plan for the remaining areas of the 56-acre site. The site includes a campground by the lake, a recreation center, ice arena, library, and senior facilities. Future plans could include a new government center, a new recreation center, an outdoor music amphitheater, and additional lakefront improvements.

“This is a tremendous opportunity to build on the important collaborative work done in the mid-2000s by the city of South Lake Tahoe, El Dorado County, and the conservancy,” said El Dorado Supervisor and Conservancy Board Chair Sue Novasel.

Nevada, Placer COVID-19 cases climb, as governor rolls back reopening in 19 other counties

Gov. Gavin Newsom on Wednesday shut down bars, wineries, museums, movie theaters and inside-restaurant dining across a wide swath of the state for three weeks.

Nevada and Placer counties are not among the 19 counties impacted by the governor’s order.

For the two-week period that ended last Monday, California’s confirmed coronavirus cases increased 45% to nearly 250,000 and hospitalizations increased 52% to 5,077. About 500 more patients were sick enough for intensive care treatment, bringing the state total of people hospitalized in ICUs to 1,528.

As of Thursday morning, Nevada County saw a 29% increase in cases over the past week, with a total of 117 cases reported. Eastern Nevada County has 81 cases, while 36 are in western county. One person has died in the county due to COVID-19.

There are 33 active cases, an increase of 20 in a week, though Nevada County’s coronavirus dashboard does not break down active cases by geographic region or report hospitalized cases.

A total of 7,070 tests have been conducted in Nevada County, which marks a 25% increase since June 25.

In Placer County, case numbers rose from 556 to 724, a 30% increase. Of those, 128 new cases were reported in south Placer County, which now has a total of 582 cases. Eastern Placer County saw 12 new cases in the past week, while 28 more were reported in Mid-Placer.

Eleven Placer County residents have died due to the coronavirus. Fourteen people are currently in the hospital, including four in intensive care units.

Total tests conducted in Placer County increased by 14.6% in the past week to 24,136.

As residents prepare to celebrate the Fourth of July weekend, Nevada County officials reminded residents in a news release to follow best practices for reducing the spread of COVID-19, including washing hands regularly, practicing physical distancing of at least 6 feet, staying home if you’re feeling sick, wearing a face covering (required in public), disinfecting high-touch surfaces and practicing good hygiene.

Gatherings between people from different households are still not allowed under the statewide stay-at-home order.

Since June 1, the county has seen the number of confirmed COVID-19 cases nearly triple, from 42 at the beginning of the month to 116 on June 30.

“As we see the number of cases go up steadily in our community and statewide, we ask that everyone take these restrictions on gatherings seriously,” Director of Nevada County Public Health Jill Blake said in the release. “Our ability to prevent the spread of COVID-19 in Nevada County relies on everyone doing their part and following current public health guidance.”

According to officials, most of the new cases in Nevada County come directly from informal gatherings between different households that are still not allowed.

“The county urges residents to do their part to prevent the spread of COVID-19 by not gathering with people outside their household this holiday weekend and following state and local public health guidance,” the release states.

AROUND THE STATE

According to the Associated Press, Newsom’s order affects Los Angeles and 18 other counties where nearly three-quarters of the state’s roughly 40 million people live. Most of Southern California is covered by the order but not San Diego, which is faring better.

Newsom imposed the nation’s first statewide stay-at-home order in March. It forced most businesses to close and prompted more than 6.7 million people to file for unemployment benefits.

For people planning gatherings of family and friends this Fourth of July weekend, Newsom urged them to reconsider. According to the Associated Press, in Los Angeles County, public health officials said many outbreaks were linked to parties and gatherings of family and friends. The county announced 35 new deaths and more than 2,000 new cases for the fourth day in a row. Nearly 2,000 people also were hospitalized — the largest number since early May.

Newsom’s order applies to 19 counties that have been on the state’s watch list for increasing coronavirus cases for at least three consecutive days. Besides, Los Angeles, they include: Contra Costa, Fresno, Glenn, Imperial, Kern, Kings, Merced, Orange, Riverside, Sacramento, San Bernardino, San Joaquin, Santa Barbara, Santa Clara, Solano, Stanislaus, Tulare and Ventura.

Loux steps down as Truckee Town Manager

After three years of service as Truckee Town Manager, Jeff Loux has decided to retire.

“I want to thank Jeff for his hard work and passion in putting Truckee on the road to success,” said Mayor David Polivy in a statement released by the town on Saturday. “Many projects he worked on will have lasting positive impacts on our community.”

During a roughly 40-year career, Loux has worked in planning, environmental policy, governance, and teaching. He worked for Truckee for nearly four years — first as a community development director before becoming town manager.

Loux’s time in Truckee was highlighted by his work toward sustainability, developing climate action plans, providing guidance in the town’s approach toward work force and affordable housing, overseeing budgets, and creating new bikeways, trails and open space.

Loux’s announcement marks the second retirement by a notable town official. In June, Police Chief Robert Leftwich announced his retirement, which will be effective Friday.

Administrative Services Director Kim Szczurek will serve as interim town manager.

Truckee announced it will be working with WBCP, Inc. for the recruitment of a new town manager. The community is also being encouraged to provide input and participate in a discussion about the next town manager. A virtual workshop will be hosted by WBCP on July 8 from 4 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. Participants will need to register for the meeting by visiting www.bit.ly/totcommunityinput.

An online survey regarding the attributes and competencies desired in the next town manager will also available at www.townoftruckee.com.

Ultimately, Truckee Town Council members will choose the next town manager.

Justin Scacco is a reporter for the Sierra Sun. Contact him at jscacco@sierrasun.com or 530-550-2643.