Appreciating the sport of fly fishing | SierraSun.com
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Appreciating the sport of fly fishing

Bruce Ajari
Gone Fishin'

Fly fishermen are an interesting lot. Perhaps it is because of the very nature of the sport. It tends to be a little different than most forms of fishing.

First, there is the fly casting. Most anglers started in some other form of fishing, where they cast a weighted offering to the fish. In fly casting, the weight of the fly line carries the lightweight flies to the target.

The transition for most anglers is pretty simple. The casting stroke for casting a weighted line has some similarities to fly casting, and most anglers pick it up quickly.

Perhaps it is the scope of knowledge that a successful fly fisher must possess that draws one to the sport. It is a lifelong learning experience for anyone who gets involved.

A fly fisher has to know quite a lot about the fish that he or she is pursuing, the aquatic insects it feeds on and the environment in which the fish lives.

Understanding the troutand#8217;s feeding habits is essential for the fly fishing angler. As a result, understanding aquatic insect behavior and life cycles is quite important to success.

Knowing about stream hydrology is also extremely important to an angler. Stream flow, currents and knowing where the good trout-holding water is located are also part of an anglerand#8217;s mental bank when fly fishing.

It seems that the learning never stops with this sport. No one ever knows it all and even the so-called experts will tell you this right away.

Perhaps that is the real allure of this sport. It is a lifelong love affair. He or she ties imitations of the aquatic insects and uses them at the appropriate time and stage of the insect emergence and in the right part of the stream. If he or she has made a proper assessment, they may be able to catch a fish or two.

Pursuing trout in beautiful places is also the other side of the sport. As has been said, and#8220;Trout do not live in ugly places!and#8221;

Fly fishers seem to be connected to their surroundings and the fish, and that seems to be what fuels the longtime pursuit and passion for the sport.

and#8212; Bruce Ajari is a Truckee resident and regular fishing columnist for the Sierra Sun and other area newspapers.


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